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ChannelYahoo News - Latest News & Headlines    
RSS File: https://www.yahoo.com/news/rss/science
Description: The latest news and headlines from Yahoo! News. Get breaking news stories and in-depth coverage with videos and photos.
  • Orca whale that carried her dead calf at least 17 days lets it go, ending 'tour of grief'      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 14:55:22 -0400

    Orca whale that carried her dead calf at least 17 days lets it go, ending 'tour of grief'An orca whale that carried her dead calf more than two weeks has let go of the body, ending her "tour of grief," researchers said. The female killer whale was first spotted on July 24 pushing the corpse of her offspring that had died 30 minutes after birth, according to the Center for Whale Research in Washington state.


    Orca whale that carried her dead calf at least 17 days lets it go, ending 'tour of grief'An orca whale that carried her dead calf more than two weeks has let go of the body, ending her "tour of grief," researchers said. The female killer whale was first spotted on July 24 pushing the corpse of her offspring that had died 30 minutes after birth, according to the Center for Whale Research in Washington state.


     

  • Hippo Kills Tourist Who Was Taking Photos by a Lake in Kenya      Sun, 12 Aug 2018 22:05:14 -0400

    Hippo Kills Tourist Who Was Taking Photos by a Lake in KenyaA Chinese tourist was attacked and killed by a hippo while taking pictures on the edge of Lake Naivasha


    Hippo Kills Tourist Who Was Taking Photos by a Lake in KenyaA Chinese tourist was attacked and killed by a hippo while taking pictures on the edge of Lake Naivasha


     

  • 'Touch the sun': NASA spacecraft hurtles toward our star      Sun, 12 Aug 2018 17:04:03 -0400

    'Touch the sun': NASA spacecraft hurtles toward our starCAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Embarking on a mission that scientists have been dreaming of since the Sputnik era, a NASA spacecraft hurtled Sunday toward the sun on a quest to unlock some of its mysteries by getting closer than any object sent before.


    'Touch the sun': NASA spacecraft hurtles toward our starCAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Embarking on a mission that scientists have been dreaming of since the Sputnik era, a NASA spacecraft hurtled Sunday toward the sun on a quest to unlock some of its mysteries by getting closer than any object sent before.


     

  • Blast at a Building in Northern Syria Kills at Least 36      Sun, 12 Aug 2018 23:18:55 -0400

    Blast at a Building in Northern Syria Kills at Least 36The opposition-run Syrian Civil Defense said the blast occurred in a village near the Turkish border, killing 36 and wounding many others


    Blast at a Building in Northern Syria Kills at Least 36The opposition-run Syrian Civil Defense said the blast occurred in a village near the Turkish border, killing 36 and wounding many others


     

  • Oldest historical structures in India known for their exquisite architecture      Sun, 12 Aug 2018 15:36:36 -0400

    Oldest historical structures in India known for their exquisite architectureOur ancient roots dating back to hundreds of centuries is not something we ponder over too frequently. But if at all we do, the sheer richness and diversity of our history is bound to leave us spellbound. With primitive tools and calculation methods in a time when modern day building materials and technology were unimaginable, our forefathers built temples and cities that have survived till date. ...


    Oldest historical structures in India known for their exquisite architectureOur ancient roots dating back to hundreds of centuries is not something we ponder over too frequently. But if at all we do, the sheer richness and diversity of our history is bound to leave us spellbound. With primitive tools and calculation methods in a time when modern day building materials and technology were unimaginable, our forefathers built temples and cities that have survived till date. ...


     

  • China Denies Detaining One Million Uighurs in 'Re-education' Camps      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 22:02:56 -0400

    China Denies Detaining One Million Uighurs in 'Re-education' CampsAccounts from the region pointed to Muslims “being treated as enemies of the state"


    China Denies Detaining One Million Uighurs in 'Re-education' CampsAccounts from the region pointed to Muslims “being treated as enemies of the state"


     

  • Alaska's North Slope hit by strongest quake noted in region      Sun, 12 Aug 2018 20:07:02 -0400

    Alaska's North Slope hit by strongest quake noted in regionKAVIK RIVER CAMP, Alaska (AP) — Alaska's North Slope was hit Sunday by the most powerful earthquake ever recorded in the region, the state's seismologist said.


    Alaska's North Slope hit by strongest quake noted in regionKAVIK RIVER CAMP, Alaska (AP) — Alaska's North Slope was hit Sunday by the most powerful earthquake ever recorded in the region, the state's seismologist said.


     

  • Prosecution Rests Its Case in Manafort Tax Evasion and Bank Fraud Trial      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 18:55:40 -0400

    Prosecution Rests Its Case in Manafort Tax Evasion and Bank Fraud TrialManafort's lawyers have not yet said whether they will call any witnesses or present other evidence in the case


    Prosecution Rests Its Case in Manafort Tax Evasion and Bank Fraud TrialManafort's lawyers have not yet said whether they will call any witnesses or present other evidence in the case


     

  • Nursing Home Blaze in Taiwan Kills Nine People and Injures 16      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 04:24:18 -0400

    Nursing Home Blaze in Taiwan Kills Nine People and Injures 16A fire at a nursing home in Taiwan early Monday left nine people dead and 16 injured.


    Nursing Home Blaze in Taiwan Kills Nine People and Injures 16A fire at a nursing home in Taiwan early Monday left nine people dead and 16 injured.


     

  • President Trump Doesn't Mention John McCain as He Signs Defense Bill Named for Him      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 15:48:59 -0400

    President Trump Doesn't Mention John McCain as He Signs Defense Bill Named for HimThe measure Trump signed Monday will boost military pay by 2.6 percent


    President Trump Doesn't Mention John McCain as He Signs Defense Bill Named for HimThe measure Trump signed Monday will boost military pay by 2.6 percent


     

  • Hawaii's newest volcanic cone is over 100 feet tall. How will it be named?      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 13:16:23 -0400

    Hawaii's newest volcanic cone is over 100 feet tall. How will it be named?The town of Volcano is swaying, back and forth. “It’s been rocking and rolling,” Bobby Camara, a Volcano resident who spent decades working as a ranger at the nearby Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, said from his Big Island home.  Though the tremors are mild, they still cause the lamps in Camara’s house to gently swing.  “You feel like you’re drunk or on a boat — the quakes are quite subtle," Camara said. SEE ALSO: The ocean is cooking off the Southern California coast. Here's why. For over three months, the southeastern portion of Hawaii has been quaking and gushing lava, though the vigorously erupting lava recently took a pause.  One of the more stark results of this activity — stoked by the movement of hot rock beneath the ground — has been the creation of a volcanic cone, appearing as a sort of blackened, miniature volcano.  Fissure 8 spews lava into the air in June.Image: usgsCurrently standing at some 100 feet tall, it grew upwards as lava fountained high into the air, and then fell in heaps back to the ground. Volcano scientists informally call it Fissure 8, and it’s known geologically as a “spatter cone.” But what might this new Hawaiian feature be named? Many local Hawaiians — both native and those that came here from other lands — want to make sure that the cone gets a Hawaiian name.  Hawaii County councilwoman Sue Lee Loy has even introduced legislation asking that the state confer with local community members to choose a meaningful name that reflects the history and character of the area where it formed. “We have a name for every wind, current, and ripple of the ocean,” Piilani Kaawaloa, a local Hawaiian community member in the Puna District whose family has lived in the area for generations, said in an interview.  Rivers of lava flowing to the coast from Fissure 8.Image: usgs“We have a name for every single cloud,” added Kaawaloa, who also sits on the Hawaiian cultural advisory committee, Aha Moku. “Our kapuna [elders] were very observant.” When a name for the new volcanic cone is eventually chosen, it will likely again come from the kapuna, who understand that this volcanism, while dramatic, is expected volcano behavior here.  The Big Island’s young volcano, Kilauea, is growing.  The naming  The U.S. Geologic Survey (USGS), which has been monitoring and researching Kilauea’s activity for decades, is staying out of the naming process, completely. “It is not the responsibility of the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) — or part of our mission — to name geologic/geographic features,” Janet Babb, an HVO geologist, said over email. While that is the case today, the government has run into some problems in the past when naming volcanic features without input from local groups in Hawaii. The salmon-colored areas show lava flows over the Big Island since May 3, 2018.Image: usgsAmid a flurry of volcanic activity in 1983, a new volcanic cone formed, similar to Fissure 8. It fed rivers of lava, and it was given a name some local Hawaiians didn't appreciate: Pu'u O. "I gave it that name," admitted Camara without hesitation. He was a 30-year-old park ranger at the time.  The cone had been erupting for a while, so rangers figured they ought to give it a name. Camara settled on "Pu'u O," a somewhat fitting name for a gushing volcanic vent, as "ō" means to "endure" or "continue." The first portion of the name wasn't the problem. "Pu'u," which means hill, bulge, or peak, is often used to describe volcanic cones around the Hawaiian islands. But the designation "ō" didn't sit well with everyone.  "They didn’t do due diligence to the community," Kaawaloa said.  Puʻu ʻŌʻō" erupting in 1983. The cone would eventually reach 200 feet in height.Elders in the community (including Piilani Kaawaloa's grandmother) soon convened. They decided on another name: "Puʻu ʻŌʻō."  "ʻŌʻō," is the digging stick of Pele, the Hawaiian goddess of fire and volcanoes. And with this formidable stick, Pele is said to have dug through the ground, unleashing the fire below.  Decades after the naming of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, there is still no official rule or law requiring the government to seek guidance from Hawaiian kapuna before naming a new lava flow or geologic feature. Rather, it's more of a norm, or a show of cultural respect.  "If anything, we can say the extent to which people who are well-versed in the places and the stories of the location are much more likely to be at play now than in the past," Samuel Ohu Gon lll, a senior scientist and cultural advisor at the Nature Conservancy of Hawaii, said in an interview. To name or not to name Councilwoman Lee Loy, with recently introduced legislation, is certainly moving the Fissure 8 naming process forward. But the evolving volcanic cone likely won't be named anytime soon. Lava from Fissure 8 meeting the ocean earlier in August.Image: usgsAnd that may be a good thing. Fissure 8 is just a few months old. It hasn't fully evolved, and therefore its character isn't fully understood. "It seems a bit premature to name the Fissure 8 cone, as it's ultimate fate is not known," said Babb, noting that Puʻu ʻŌʻō wasn't officially named for three years until after it formed. Some community members, like Kaawaloa, also believe it's a better idea to wait, and watch. "The local community is not in a hurry to name it," Kaawaloa said. "Because you have got to look at the characteristics of the lava flow, and the changes of the lava flow." Moving too quickly "defeats the purpose of 'pono' — making things right," Kaawaloa said. Although a well-known community member, Kaawaloa doesn't think she necessarily needs to be on the council that ultimately names Fissure 8. "It doesn't have to be me," she said. But if she does contribute, Kaawaloa said it's a serious undertaking. She would be naming a place for perpetuity — or, at least, until it gets smothered in a new lava flow.   Fissure 8 feeding a river of lava on June 21."The question is, do I want to be responsible?" she said.  It's not easy to choose a name for an evolving place. Volcanic cones can quickly collapse down into the dark, steaming underworlds whence they came.  In February 1997, 14 years after it was born, Puʻu ʻŌʻō collapsed. "When the time is right, a name will reveal itself," said Camara, who noted he lives too far from Fissure 8 to be involved in such a hyper-local naming process. Camara just believes it should be a descriptive or poetic name, he said, pausing as another quake rocked his home. Anything can happen with a young volcano, he continued. So it's just best to watch, for now. "For all we know, the Fissure 8 cone is going to fall into a big-ass hole — and then what are you going to do?" WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?        


    Hawaii's newest volcanic cone is over 100 feet tall. How will it be named?The town of Volcano is swaying, back and forth. “It’s been rocking and rolling,” Bobby Camara, a Volcano resident who spent decades working as a ranger at the nearby Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, said from his Big Island home.  Though the tremors are mild, they still cause the lamps in Camara’s house to gently swing.  “You feel like you’re drunk or on a boat — the quakes are quite subtle," Camara said. SEE ALSO: The ocean is cooking off the Southern California coast. Here's why. For over three months, the southeastern portion of Hawaii has been quaking and gushing lava, though the vigorously erupting lava recently took a pause.  One of the more stark results of this activity — stoked by the movement of hot rock beneath the ground — has been the creation of a volcanic cone, appearing as a sort of blackened, miniature volcano.  Fissure 8 spews lava into the air in June.Image: usgsCurrently standing at some 100 feet tall, it grew upwards as lava fountained high into the air, and then fell in heaps back to the ground. Volcano scientists informally call it Fissure 8, and it’s known geologically as a “spatter cone.” But what might this new Hawaiian feature be named? Many local Hawaiians — both native and those that came here from other lands — want to make sure that the cone gets a Hawaiian name.  Hawaii County councilwoman Sue Lee Loy has even introduced legislation asking that the state confer with local community members to choose a meaningful name that reflects the history and character of the area where it formed. “We have a name for every wind, current, and ripple of the ocean,” Piilani Kaawaloa, a local Hawaiian community member in the Puna District whose family has lived in the area for generations, said in an interview.  Rivers of lava flowing to the coast from Fissure 8.Image: usgs“We have a name for every single cloud,” added Kaawaloa, who also sits on the Hawaiian cultural advisory committee, Aha Moku. “Our kapuna [elders] were very observant.” When a name for the new volcanic cone is eventually chosen, it will likely again come from the kapuna, who understand that this volcanism, while dramatic, is expected volcano behavior here.  The Big Island’s young volcano, Kilauea, is growing.  The naming  The U.S. Geologic Survey (USGS), which has been monitoring and researching Kilauea’s activity for decades, is staying out of the naming process, completely. “It is not the responsibility of the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) — or part of our mission — to name geologic/geographic features,” Janet Babb, an HVO geologist, said over email. While that is the case today, the government has run into some problems in the past when naming volcanic features without input from local groups in Hawaii. The salmon-colored areas show lava flows over the Big Island since May 3, 2018.Image: usgsAmid a flurry of volcanic activity in 1983, a new volcanic cone formed, similar to Fissure 8. It fed rivers of lava, and it was given a name some local Hawaiians didn't appreciate: Pu'u O. "I gave it that name," admitted Camara without hesitation. He was a 30-year-old park ranger at the time.  The cone had been erupting for a while, so rangers figured they ought to give it a name. Camara settled on "Pu'u O," a somewhat fitting name for a gushing volcanic vent, as "ō" means to "endure" or "continue." The first portion of the name wasn't the problem. "Pu'u," which means hill, bulge, or peak, is often used to describe volcanic cones around the Hawaiian islands. But the designation "ō" didn't sit well with everyone.  "They didn’t do due diligence to the community," Kaawaloa said.  Puʻu ʻŌʻō" erupting in 1983. The cone would eventually reach 200 feet in height.Elders in the community (including Piilani Kaawaloa's grandmother) soon convened. They decided on another name: "Puʻu ʻŌʻō."  "ʻŌʻō," is the digging stick of Pele, the Hawaiian goddess of fire and volcanoes. And with this formidable stick, Pele is said to have dug through the ground, unleashing the fire below.  Decades after the naming of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, there is still no official rule or law requiring the government to seek guidance from Hawaiian kapuna before naming a new lava flow or geologic feature. Rather, it's more of a norm, or a show of cultural respect.  "If anything, we can say the extent to which people who are well-versed in the places and the stories of the location are much more likely to be at play now than in the past," Samuel Ohu Gon lll, a senior scientist and cultural advisor at the Nature Conservancy of Hawaii, said in an interview. To name or not to name Councilwoman Lee Loy, with recently introduced legislation, is certainly moving the Fissure 8 naming process forward. But the evolving volcanic cone likely won't be named anytime soon. Lava from Fissure 8 meeting the ocean earlier in August.Image: usgsAnd that may be a good thing. Fissure 8 is just a few months old. It hasn't fully evolved, and therefore its character isn't fully understood. "It seems a bit premature to name the Fissure 8 cone, as it's ultimate fate is not known," said Babb, noting that Puʻu ʻŌʻō wasn't officially named for three years until after it formed. Some community members, like Kaawaloa, also believe it's a better idea to wait, and watch. "The local community is not in a hurry to name it," Kaawaloa said. "Because you have got to look at the characteristics of the lava flow, and the changes of the lava flow." Moving too quickly "defeats the purpose of 'pono' — making things right," Kaawaloa said. Although a well-known community member, Kaawaloa doesn't think she necessarily needs to be on the council that ultimately names Fissure 8. "It doesn't have to be me," she said. But if she does contribute, Kaawaloa said it's a serious undertaking. She would be naming a place for perpetuity — or, at least, until it gets smothered in a new lava flow.   Fissure 8 feeding a river of lava on June 21."The question is, do I want to be responsible?" she said.  It's not easy to choose a name for an evolving place. Volcanic cones can quickly collapse down into the dark, steaming underworlds whence they came.  In February 1997, 14 years after it was born, Puʻu ʻŌʻō collapsed. "When the time is right, a name will reveal itself," said Camara, who noted he lives too far from Fissure 8 to be involved in such a hyper-local naming process. Camara just believes it should be a descriptive or poetic name, he said, pausing as another quake rocked his home. Anything can happen with a young volcano, he continued. So it's just best to watch, for now. "For all we know, the Fissure 8 cone is going to fall into a big-ass hole — and then what are you going to do?" WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?        


     

  • Turkish Lira Slides to a Record Low as Erdogan Remains Defiant in Face of Financial Crisis      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 00:59:53 -0400

    Turkish Lira Slides to a Record Low as Erdogan Remains Defiant in Face of Financial CrisisTurkish currency has fallen to 25 percent in the past month as Erdogan maintains his defiance toward the U.S. and financial-market orthodoxy


    Turkish Lira Slides to a Record Low as Erdogan Remains Defiant in Face of Financial CrisisTurkish currency has fallen to 25 percent in the past month as Erdogan maintains his defiance toward the U.S. and financial-market orthodoxy


     

  • Harsh Treatment of Immigrant Children at Virginia Detention Center Was Not Abuse, Investigators Say      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 15:04:54 -0400

    Harsh Treatment of Immigrant Children at Virginia Detention Center Was Not Abuse, Investigators SayThe facility uses restraint techniques, including strapping children to chairs


    Harsh Treatment of Immigrant Children at Virginia Detention Center Was Not Abuse, Investigators SayThe facility uses restraint techniques, including strapping children to chairs


     

  • In Defiance of China, a Pro-Independence Activist Speaks at Hong Kong's Foreign Correspondents Club      Tue, 14 Aug 2018 05:09:09 -0400

    In Defiance of China, a Pro-Independence Activist Speaks at Hong Kong's Foreign Correspondents ClubChina's Ministry of Foreign Affairs called it a "blatant interference with the rule of law"


    In Defiance of China, a Pro-Independence Activist Speaks at Hong Kong's Foreign Correspondents ClubChina's Ministry of Foreign Affairs called it a "blatant interference with the rule of law"


     

  • Young Boy Found at a New Mexico Compound Died in a Ritual Ceremony, Prosecutors Say      Tue, 14 Aug 2018 05:42:32 -0400

    Young Boy Found at a New Mexico Compound Died in a Ritual Ceremony, Prosecutors SayProsecutors in New Mexico told a court Monday that a 3 year-old boy whose remains were found in a remote compound had died during a ritual ceremony “to cast out demonic spirits.”


    Young Boy Found at a New Mexico Compound Died in a Ritual Ceremony, Prosecutors SayProsecutors in New Mexico told a court Monday that a 3 year-old boy whose remains were found in a remote compound had died during a ritual ceremony “to cast out demonic spirits.”


     

  • 'Beebo Was Loved By Everyone.' Family Left Heartbroken After Airline Worker Steals and Crashes Plane      Sun, 12 Aug 2018 13:05:36 -0400

    'Beebo Was Loved By Everyone.' Family Left Heartbroken After Airline Worker Steals and Crashes Plane29-year-old Richard B. Russell was an employee of Horizon Air


    'Beebo Was Loved By Everyone.' Family Left Heartbroken After Airline Worker Steals and Crashes Plane29-year-old Richard B. Russell was an employee of Horizon Air


     

  • Governors: Trump directive could hurt effort to save bird      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 15:30:42 -0400

    Governors: Trump directive could hurt effort to save birdDENVER (AP) — Some governors in the U.S. West say a new Trump administration directive threatens to undermine a hard-won compromise aimed at saving a beleaguered bird scattered across their region.


    Governors: Trump directive could hurt effort to save birdDENVER (AP) — Some governors in the U.S. West say a new Trump administration directive threatens to undermine a hard-won compromise aimed at saving a beleaguered bird scattered across their region.


     

  • White Man Charged in Florida 'Stand Your Ground' Killing of Black Father      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 12:26:39 -0400

    White Man Charged in Florida 'Stand Your Ground' Killing of Black Father47-year-old Michael Drejka has been charged with manslaughter


    White Man Charged in Florida 'Stand Your Ground' Killing of Black Father47-year-old Michael Drejka has been charged with manslaughter


     

  • Perseids meteor shower 2018: Everything you need to know about last night's peak      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 01:23:23 -0400

    Perseids meteor shower 2018: Everything you need to know about last night's peakEvery year our skies are lit up by returning meteor showers, from Perseids to Lyrids, Orionids to Geminids. If the weather conditions are in our favour and the moon isn't too bright, there's a chance you'll be able to see some spectacular shooting stars in action. Here is our guide to the must-see meteor showers of 2018 – including the spectacular Perseids shower which was at its peak overnight – as well as where and how to see them. What exactly is a meteor shower? A meteor shower occurs when Earth passes through the debris stream occupying the orbit of a comet - or, in simpler terms, when a number of meteors flash across the sky from roughly the same point. Meteors are sometimes called shooting stars, although they actually have nothing to do with stars. Perseids meteor shower 2018 - in pictures Perspective makes meteor showers appear to emanate from a single point in the sky known as the shower radiant. A typical meteor results from a particle the size of a grain of sand vaporising in Earth’s atmosphere when it enters at 134,000mph. Something larger than a grape will produce a fireball and this is often accompanied by a persistent afterglow known as a meteor train. This is a column of ionised gas slowly fading from view as it loses energy. Meteor, meteorid or meteroite? Let's get this straight. A meteor is a meteoroid – or a particle broken off an asteroid or comet orbiting the Sun – that burns up as it enters the Earth's atmosphere creating the effect of a "shooting star". Meteoroids that reach the Earth's surface without disintegrating are called meteorites. Meteors are mostly pieces of comet dust and ice no larger than a grain of rice. Meteorites are principally rocks broken off asteroids in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and can weigh as much as 60 tonnes. They can be "stony", made up of minerals rich in silicon and oxygen, "iron", consisting mainly of iron and nickel, or "stony-iron", a combination of the two. The Geminids meteor shower in Vladivostok, Russia in December 2017 Credit: Yuri Smityuk Scientists think about 1,000 tons to more than 10,000 tons of material from meteors falls on Earth each day, but it's mostly dust-like grains, according to Nasa, and they pose no threat to Earth. There are only two incidents recorded where people reported being injured by a meteorite, including one in 1954 when a woman was bruised by a meteorite weighing eight pounds after it fell through her roof.  When is the next meteor shower? The meteor shower currently gracing our skies is the Perseids, which began in the middle of July and grows in intensity before peaking in mid-August every year.  The shower appears to originate from within the star constellation Perseus – hence the shower's name. It occurs when Earth passes through the debris stream occupying the orbit of the comet Swift-Tuttle. The wonderfully named comet is the largest object known to repeatedly pass Earth (it's 16 miles wide). It orbits the sun ever 133 years and each time it passes through the inner solar system it warms up, releasing fresh comet material into its orbital stream. The last time it was closest to the sun was in December 1992. It will be back again in July 2126.  Perseid meteor radiant When can I see the Perseid meteor shower? The window for the current Perseid meteor shower is from July 17 to August 24 2018. Stargazers stand a chance of seeing the shower at any point in this window, however the peak will occur between August 12 and August 13.  The best time to take a look at the sky will be from about 1am BST in the Northern Hemisphere until the onset of dawn twilight. Peak rates of 150-200 meteors per hour were recorded in 2016, but typical rates are about 80 meteors an hour streaking across the night sky, each leaving a trail.   To see it, look at a height approximately two-thirds up the sky in any direction. If you want a recommendation, east through south offers some great background constellations in the early hours during August. Look for the shower's "radiant" from the north-east corner of Perseus. 2018 | Major meteor showers The best stargazing spots in the UK A dark night is best for a meteor shower, after midnight and before dawn.  Head somewhere away from the bright lights - into more rural areas if you can - and be prepared to wait a good hour if you want the best chance of seeing a shower. Look for a wide, open viewing area - perhaps a national park or large field on the side of a road - and make sure you concentrate your gaze towards the east. Meteor showers are unpredictable though, so prepare for the fact you might not see much. Choose a dark location away from stray lights and give yourself at least 20 minutes in total darkness to properly dark adapt.  Britain has some wonderful stargazing locations, including three "Dark Sky Reserves" (Snowdonia, Brecon Beacons and Exmoor national parks) and Europe's largest "Dark Sky Park" (Northumberland National Park and the adjoining Kielder Water and Forest Park). best stargazing locations Galloway Forest Park: Galloway is a couple of hours from Glasgow and an hour from Carlisle. The park's most popular spot for stargazing is Loch Trool. Exmoor and around: Exmoor was granted International Dark-Sky Reserve status by the International Dark-Sky Association in 2011. Light pollution is managed to make the area more appealing to amateur astronomers. Romney Marsh: Night once provided cover for smugglers known as Owlers, but today Romney Marsh offers celestial bounty, arching over a landscape adorned with the spires of ancient churches. Kielder: Kielder Forest is officially the darkest place in England – 250 square miles of wooded beauty where Northumberland brushes against Scotland. It has its own fabulous, modern, wood-clad observatory on the slopes of Black Fell above Kielder Water. North York Moors: As well as stunning night skies, the North York Moors boast historic market towns such as Helmsley and Pickering, plus appealing coastal spots, including Scarborough and Whitby. The other major meteor showers to look out for in 2018 The Quadrantid meteor shower The Quadrantids was the first major meteor shower of 2018; it peaked at around 8pm on January 3 when between 10 and 60 meteors were shooting per hour.  It had a sharp peak, which means the best of the shower only lasted a few hours - although it remained active until January 12th. First spotted in 1825 by the Italian astronomer Antonio Brucalassi, astronomers suspect the shower originates from the comet C/1490 Y1, which was first observed 500 years ago by Japanese, Chinese and Korean astronomers. Why is it called Quadrantid? The Quadrantids appear to radiate from the extinct constellation Quadrans Muralis, which is now part of the Boötes constellation and not far from the Big Dipper. Because of the constellation's position in the sky, the shower is often impossible to see in the Southern Hemisphere - however there is a chance of spotting it up to 51 degrees south latitude. The best spots to see the display are in countries with high northern latitudes, like Norway, Sweden, Canada and Finland. The Lyrid meteor shower The Lyrid meteor shower takes places annually between April 16 and April 25. In 2018, it peaked on the morning of April 22, with the greatest number of meteors falling during the few hours before dawn. With no moon, stargazers might have been able to see between 10 and 20 Lyrid meteors per hour at the shower's peak.  Lyrid meteors are typically as bright as the stars in the Big Dipper, but some are much more intense, even brighter than Venus, the brightest object in the night sky after the moon. Called "Lyrid fireballs", these cast shadows for a split second and leave behind smokey debris trails that linger for minutes. Tim Peake space pictures What causes the Lyrid meteor shower? The ionised gas in the meteors' trail burns up as it enters the Earth's atmosphere, creates the glow which can be seen streaking across the night sky.  The shower occurs as the Earth passes through the dust left over from Comet Thatcher (C/186 G1), which makes a full orbit of the sun once every 415 years (which is why there are no photographs of it). Flakes of comet dust, most no bigger than grains of sand, strike Earth's atmosphere traveling 49 km/s (110,000 mph) and disintegrate as streaks of light. Comet Thatcher last visited the inner solar system in 1861 - before the widespread use of photography  - and isn’t expected to return until the year 2276. How did the Lyrids get its name? The shower radiates out from the direction of the star Vega, the brightest light in the constellation Lyra the Harp, from which it takes its name. Vega is a brilliant blue-white star about three times wider than our Sun and 25 light years away. The Lyrids radiating from the vicinity of the blue star Lyra Credit: earthsky.org You might remember Vega being mentioned in Carl Sagan's movie Contact - it was the source of alien radio transmissions to Earth. When were the Lyrids first observed and recorded? The earliest sightings of the Lyrid meteor shower go back 2,700 years and are among the oldest of known meteor showers. In the year 687 BC the ancient Chinese observed the meteors and recorded them in the ancient Zuo Zhan chronicles saying:  "On the 4th month in the summer in the year of xīn-mǎo (of year 7 of King Zhuang of Lu), at night, (the sky is so bright that some) fixed stars become invisible (because of the meteor shower); at midnight, stars fell like rain. That era of Chinese history corresponds with what is now called the Spring and Autumn Period (about 771 to 476 BC). Tradition associates this period with the Chinese teacher and philosopher Confucius, one of the first to espouse the principle: “Do not do to others what you do not want done to yourself.”   American observers saw an outburst of nearly 100 Lyrid meteors per hour in 1982. Around 100 meteors per hour were seen in Greece in 1922 and from Japan in 1945. The Orionid meteor shower The Orionid meteors appear every year, with showers producing around 20 meteors every hour. The shower is active throughout October until November 7, but the best time to see it will be on October 20 between midnight and dawn, when the sky is darkest and the shower will be at its brightest. Tom Kerss, an astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich said:"If you can brave the cold, make a plan to stay out and enjoy the thrill of seeing tiny flecks of Halley's Comet disintegrate at hypersonic speeds above your head." He advises finding a secluded spot and allowing the eyes to adjust to the darkness. Orionid meteors streak across the sky over Kula town of Manisa, Turkey on October 21, 2017 Credit:  Anadolu Agency Mr Kerss said: "There's no advantage to using binoculars or a telescope, your eyes are the best tool available for spotting meteors, so relax and gaze up at the sky, and eventually your patience will be rewarded. "Meteors can appear anywhere in the sky, though if you have to pick a direction, you might fare slightly better looking east." The meteoroids from Halley's Comet strike Earth's atmosphere at a speed of 148,000mph, (238,000kph) burning up in streaking flashes of light that can be seen with the naked eye. Orionid meteors are known for their speed and brilliance, so if you persevere there's a good chance you'll see several bright 'shooting stars' zipping across the sky. The Orionid Meteor Shower is one of two meteor showers created by debris from Halley's Comet - the other is the Eta Aquarids, which occurs in May. Unfortunately, Halley's Comet itself has not been visible from Earth since 1986. Why is it called Orionid? It's named Orionid because it appears to radiate from the constellation Orion. Orion is one of the brightest and best known constellations and contains two of the 10 brightest stars in the sky Rigel and Betelgeuse, as well as the famous Orion's Belt.  Orion's Belt is made up of three bright stars quite close together almost in a straight line, and is about 1,500 light years from us on Earth.  Orion has been known since ancient times and is also referred to as Hunter thanks to Greek mythology. He is often seen in star maps facing Taurus, the bull. The Geminid meteor shower The Geminids are an annual meteor shower caused by the 3200 Phaethon asteroid. Its orbit brings it very close to the sun, causing its surface material to crumble and break off. The Earth passes through this space debris every December, which burns up as hits our atmosphere. These are the meteors visible in our sky. The Geminids were first observed relatively recently, in 1862, compared with the Perseids (36AD) and the Leonids (902AD). The meteor shower appears to come from a point in the constellation Gemini, hence its name. The Geminids meteor shower over Egersheld Cape on Russky Island in the Sea of Japan in December 2017 Credit:  Yuri Smityuk When can it be seen? The next Geminid meteor shower can be seen from around December 4th to 17th, with peak activity from about 10pm on December 13th and into the early hours of the 14th.  Sightings are possible around the world, but there's good news for Britons: the shower favours observers in the Northern Hemisphere over those in the Southern. If you're lucky you could see up to 100 meteors or 'shooting stars' every hour. You can spot the meteors anywhere, but they will appear to come from the Gemini constellation. Stars in the Milky Way over Kielder Forest Credit: Owen Humphreys During December, it begins the evening in the east and moves across the sky to the west during the night. Find Orion's Belt - three bright stars positioned in a row - and then look above it and a little to the left. They will appear as streaks of light, and will sometimes arrive in bursts of two or three. They vary in colour, depending on their composition. An average of 120 meteors an hour - or two a minute - can be expected, or more during the 2am peak.


    Perseids meteor shower 2018: Everything you need to know about last night's peakEvery year our skies are lit up by returning meteor showers, from Perseids to Lyrids, Orionids to Geminids. If the weather conditions are in our favour and the moon isn't too bright, there's a chance you'll be able to see some spectacular shooting stars in action. Here is our guide to the must-see meteor showers of 2018 – including the spectacular Perseids shower which was at its peak overnight – as well as where and how to see them. What exactly is a meteor shower? A meteor shower occurs when Earth passes through the debris stream occupying the orbit of a comet - or, in simpler terms, when a number of meteors flash across the sky from roughly the same point. Meteors are sometimes called shooting stars, although they actually have nothing to do with stars. Perseids meteor shower 2018 - in pictures Perspective makes meteor showers appear to emanate from a single point in the sky known as the shower radiant. A typical meteor results from a particle the size of a grain of sand vaporising in Earth’s atmosphere when it enters at 134,000mph. Something larger than a grape will produce a fireball and this is often accompanied by a persistent afterglow known as a meteor train. This is a column of ionised gas slowly fading from view as it loses energy. Meteor, meteorid or meteroite? Let's get this straight. A meteor is a meteoroid – or a particle broken off an asteroid or comet orbiting the Sun – that burns up as it enters the Earth's atmosphere creating the effect of a "shooting star". Meteoroids that reach the Earth's surface without disintegrating are called meteorites. Meteors are mostly pieces of comet dust and ice no larger than a grain of rice. Meteorites are principally rocks broken off asteroids in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and can weigh as much as 60 tonnes. They can be "stony", made up of minerals rich in silicon and oxygen, "iron", consisting mainly of iron and nickel, or "stony-iron", a combination of the two. The Geminids meteor shower in Vladivostok, Russia in December 2017 Credit: Yuri Smityuk Scientists think about 1,000 tons to more than 10,000 tons of material from meteors falls on Earth each day, but it's mostly dust-like grains, according to Nasa, and they pose no threat to Earth. There are only two incidents recorded where people reported being injured by a meteorite, including one in 1954 when a woman was bruised by a meteorite weighing eight pounds after it fell through her roof.  When is the next meteor shower? The meteor shower currently gracing our skies is the Perseids, which began in the middle of July and grows in intensity before peaking in mid-August every year.  The shower appears to originate from within the star constellation Perseus – hence the shower's name. It occurs when Earth passes through the debris stream occupying the orbit of the comet Swift-Tuttle. The wonderfully named comet is the largest object known to repeatedly pass Earth (it's 16 miles wide). It orbits the sun ever 133 years and each time it passes through the inner solar system it warms up, releasing fresh comet material into its orbital stream. The last time it was closest to the sun was in December 1992. It will be back again in July 2126.  Perseid meteor radiant When can I see the Perseid meteor shower? The window for the current Perseid meteor shower is from July 17 to August 24 2018. Stargazers stand a chance of seeing the shower at any point in this window, however the peak will occur between August 12 and August 13.  The best time to take a look at the sky will be from about 1am BST in the Northern Hemisphere until the onset of dawn twilight. Peak rates of 150-200 meteors per hour were recorded in 2016, but typical rates are about 80 meteors an hour streaking across the night sky, each leaving a trail.   To see it, look at a height approximately two-thirds up the sky in any direction. If you want a recommendation, east through south offers some great background constellations in the early hours during August. Look for the shower's "radiant" from the north-east corner of Perseus. 2018 | Major meteor showers The best stargazing spots in the UK A dark night is best for a meteor shower, after midnight and before dawn.  Head somewhere away from the bright lights - into more rural areas if you can - and be prepared to wait a good hour if you want the best chance of seeing a shower. Look for a wide, open viewing area - perhaps a national park or large field on the side of a road - and make sure you concentrate your gaze towards the east. Meteor showers are unpredictable though, so prepare for the fact you might not see much. Choose a dark location away from stray lights and give yourself at least 20 minutes in total darkness to properly dark adapt.  Britain has some wonderful stargazing locations, including three "Dark Sky Reserves" (Snowdonia, Brecon Beacons and Exmoor national parks) and Europe's largest "Dark Sky Park" (Northumberland National Park and the adjoining Kielder Water and Forest Park). best stargazing locations Galloway Forest Park: Galloway is a couple of hours from Glasgow and an hour from Carlisle. The park's most popular spot for stargazing is Loch Trool. Exmoor and around: Exmoor was granted International Dark-Sky Reserve status by the International Dark-Sky Association in 2011. Light pollution is managed to make the area more appealing to amateur astronomers. Romney Marsh: Night once provided cover for smugglers known as Owlers, but today Romney Marsh offers celestial bounty, arching over a landscape adorned with the spires of ancient churches. Kielder: Kielder Forest is officially the darkest place in England – 250 square miles of wooded beauty where Northumberland brushes against Scotland. It has its own fabulous, modern, wood-clad observatory on the slopes of Black Fell above Kielder Water. North York Moors: As well as stunning night skies, the North York Moors boast historic market towns such as Helmsley and Pickering, plus appealing coastal spots, including Scarborough and Whitby. The other major meteor showers to look out for in 2018 The Quadrantid meteor shower The Quadrantids was the first major meteor shower of 2018; it peaked at around 8pm on January 3 when between 10 and 60 meteors were shooting per hour.  It had a sharp peak, which means the best of the shower only lasted a few hours - although it remained active until January 12th. First spotted in 1825 by the Italian astronomer Antonio Brucalassi, astronomers suspect the shower originates from the comet C/1490 Y1, which was first observed 500 years ago by Japanese, Chinese and Korean astronomers. Why is it called Quadrantid? The Quadrantids appear to radiate from the extinct constellation Quadrans Muralis, which is now part of the Boötes constellation and not far from the Big Dipper. Because of the constellation's position in the sky, the shower is often impossible to see in the Southern Hemisphere - however there is a chance of spotting it up to 51 degrees south latitude. The best spots to see the display are in countries with high northern latitudes, like Norway, Sweden, Canada and Finland. The Lyrid meteor shower The Lyrid meteor shower takes places annually between April 16 and April 25. In 2018, it peaked on the morning of April 22, with the greatest number of meteors falling during the few hours before dawn. With no moon, stargazers might have been able to see between 10 and 20 Lyrid meteors per hour at the shower's peak.  Lyrid meteors are typically as bright as the stars in the Big Dipper, but some are much more intense, even brighter than Venus, the brightest object in the night sky after the moon. Called "Lyrid fireballs", these cast shadows for a split second and leave behind smokey debris trails that linger for minutes. Tim Peake space pictures What causes the Lyrid meteor shower? The ionised gas in the meteors' trail burns up as it enters the Earth's atmosphere, creates the glow which can be seen streaking across the night sky.  The shower occurs as the Earth passes through the dust left over from Comet Thatcher (C/186 G1), which makes a full orbit of the sun once every 415 years (which is why there are no photographs of it). Flakes of comet dust, most no bigger than grains of sand, strike Earth's atmosphere traveling 49 km/s (110,000 mph) and disintegrate as streaks of light. Comet Thatcher last visited the inner solar system in 1861 - before the widespread use of photography  - and isn’t expected to return until the year 2276. How did the Lyrids get its name? The shower radiates out from the direction of the star Vega, the brightest light in the constellation Lyra the Harp, from which it takes its name. Vega is a brilliant blue-white star about three times wider than our Sun and 25 light years away. The Lyrids radiating from the vicinity of the blue star Lyra Credit: earthsky.org You might remember Vega being mentioned in Carl Sagan's movie Contact - it was the source of alien radio transmissions to Earth. When were the Lyrids first observed and recorded? The earliest sightings of the Lyrid meteor shower go back 2,700 years and are among the oldest of known meteor showers. In the year 687 BC the ancient Chinese observed the meteors and recorded them in the ancient Zuo Zhan chronicles saying:  "On the 4th month in the summer in the year of xīn-mǎo (of year 7 of King Zhuang of Lu), at night, (the sky is so bright that some) fixed stars become invisible (because of the meteor shower); at midnight, stars fell like rain. That era of Chinese history corresponds with what is now called the Spring and Autumn Period (about 771 to 476 BC). Tradition associates this period with the Chinese teacher and philosopher Confucius, one of the first to espouse the principle: “Do not do to others what you do not want done to yourself.”   American observers saw an outburst of nearly 100 Lyrid meteors per hour in 1982. Around 100 meteors per hour were seen in Greece in 1922 and from Japan in 1945. The Orionid meteor shower The Orionid meteors appear every year, with showers producing around 20 meteors every hour. The shower is active throughout October until November 7, but the best time to see it will be on October 20 between midnight and dawn, when the sky is darkest and the shower will be at its brightest. Tom Kerss, an astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich said:"If you can brave the cold, make a plan to stay out and enjoy the thrill of seeing tiny flecks of Halley's Comet disintegrate at hypersonic speeds above your head." He advises finding a secluded spot and allowing the eyes to adjust to the darkness. Orionid meteors streak across the sky over Kula town of Manisa, Turkey on October 21, 2017 Credit:  Anadolu Agency Mr Kerss said: "There's no advantage to using binoculars or a telescope, your eyes are the best tool available for spotting meteors, so relax and gaze up at the sky, and eventually your patience will be rewarded. "Meteors can appear anywhere in the sky, though if you have to pick a direction, you might fare slightly better looking east." The meteoroids from Halley's Comet strike Earth's atmosphere at a speed of 148,000mph, (238,000kph) burning up in streaking flashes of light that can be seen with the naked eye. Orionid meteors are known for their speed and brilliance, so if you persevere there's a good chance you'll see several bright 'shooting stars' zipping across the sky. The Orionid Meteor Shower is one of two meteor showers created by debris from Halley's Comet - the other is the Eta Aquarids, which occurs in May. Unfortunately, Halley's Comet itself has not been visible from Earth since 1986. Why is it called Orionid? It's named Orionid because it appears to radiate from the constellation Orion. Orion is one of the brightest and best known constellations and contains two of the 10 brightest stars in the sky Rigel and Betelgeuse, as well as the famous Orion's Belt.  Orion's Belt is made up of three bright stars quite close together almost in a straight line, and is about 1,500 light years from us on Earth.  Orion has been known since ancient times and is also referred to as Hunter thanks to Greek mythology. He is often seen in star maps facing Taurus, the bull. The Geminid meteor shower The Geminids are an annual meteor shower caused by the 3200 Phaethon asteroid. Its orbit brings it very close to the sun, causing its surface material to crumble and break off. The Earth passes through this space debris every December, which burns up as hits our atmosphere. These are the meteors visible in our sky. The Geminids were first observed relatively recently, in 1862, compared with the Perseids (36AD) and the Leonids (902AD). The meteor shower appears to come from a point in the constellation Gemini, hence its name. The Geminids meteor shower over Egersheld Cape on Russky Island in the Sea of Japan in December 2017 Credit:  Yuri Smityuk When can it be seen? The next Geminid meteor shower can be seen from around December 4th to 17th, with peak activity from about 10pm on December 13th and into the early hours of the 14th.  Sightings are possible around the world, but there's good news for Britons: the shower favours observers in the Northern Hemisphere over those in the Southern. If you're lucky you could see up to 100 meteors or 'shooting stars' every hour. You can spot the meteors anywhere, but they will appear to come from the Gemini constellation. Stars in the Milky Way over Kielder Forest Credit: Owen Humphreys During December, it begins the evening in the east and moves across the sky to the west during the night. Find Orion's Belt - three bright stars positioned in a row - and then look above it and a little to the left. They will appear as streaks of light, and will sometimes arrive in bursts of two or three. They vary in colour, depending on their composition. An average of 120 meteors an hour - or two a minute - can be expected, or more during the 2am peak.


     

  • U.S. warns on Russia's new space weapons      Tue, 14 Aug 2018 08:59:28 -0400

    U.S. warns on Russia's new space weaponsRussia's pursuit of counterspace capabilities was "disturbing", Yleem D.S. Poblete, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Arms Control, Verification and Compliance, told the U.N.'s Conference on Disarmament which is discussing a new treaty to prevent an arms race in outer space. Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, at the Geneva forum in February, said a priority was to prevent an arms race in outer space, in line with Russia's joint draft treaty with China presented a decade ago. "To the United States this is yet further proof that the Russian actions do not match their words," she said.


    U.S. warns on Russia's new space weaponsRussia's pursuit of counterspace capabilities was "disturbing", Yleem D.S. Poblete, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Arms Control, Verification and Compliance, told the U.N.'s Conference on Disarmament which is discussing a new treaty to prevent an arms race in outer space. Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, at the Geneva forum in February, said a priority was to prevent an arms race in outer space, in line with Russia's joint draft treaty with China presented a decade ago. "To the United States this is yet further proof that the Russian actions do not match their words," she said.


     

  • New Study Finally Reveals Origin of Ultra-Rare Blue Diamonds      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 17:00:16 -0400

    New Study Finally Reveals Origin of Ultra-Rare Blue DiamondsA recent GIA study reveals the long-secret source of that extraordinary blue hue.


    New Study Finally Reveals Origin of Ultra-Rare Blue DiamondsA recent GIA study reveals the long-secret source of that extraordinary blue hue.


     

  • Protestors Against Racial Hatred Counter White Supremacists on Charlottesville Rally Anniversary      Sun, 12 Aug 2018 15:58:22 -0400

    Protestors Against Racial Hatred Counter White Supremacists on Charlottesville Rally AnniversaryA second 'Unite the Right' rally is being held in D.C. Sunday


    Protestors Against Racial Hatred Counter White Supremacists on Charlottesville Rally AnniversaryA second 'Unite the Right' rally is being held in D.C. Sunday


     

  • Whether You’re Right- or Left-Handed Has Nothing to Do With Your Brain      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 13:44:00 -0400

    Whether You’re Right- or Left-Handed Has Nothing to Do With Your BrainScientists say hand preference develops before the brain's motor cortex controls the body.


    Whether You’re Right- or Left-Handed Has Nothing to Do With Your BrainScientists say hand preference develops before the brain's motor cortex controls the body.


     

  • The First Woman Was Sworn Into the Marine Corps a Century Ago. Now a Group of Veterans Is Trying to Preserve Her Story      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 09:00:10 -0400

    The First Woman Was Sworn Into the Marine Corps a Century Ago. Now a Group of Veterans Is Trying to Preserve Her StorySee the enlistment papers for the first woman to join the U.S. Marine Corps


    The First Woman Was Sworn Into the Marine Corps a Century Ago. Now a Group of Veterans Is Trying to Preserve Her StorySee the enlistment papers for the first woman to join the U.S. Marine Corps


     

  • North and South Korean Leaders Will Meet in Pyongyang in September      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 02:34:22 -0400

    North and South Korean Leaders Will Meet in Pyongyang in SeptemberThere's renewed worries about a nuclear standoff between U.S. and North Korea


    North and South Korean Leaders Will Meet in Pyongyang in SeptemberThere's renewed worries about a nuclear standoff between U.S. and North Korea


     

  • Police Video Shows a Daring Mission to Save Dozens of Shelter Animals From Wildfires      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 08:16:25 -0400

    Police Video Shows a Daring Mission to Save Dozens of Shelter Animals From WildfiresCalifornia cops saved 60 cats and dogs


    Police Video Shows a Daring Mission to Save Dozens of Shelter Animals From WildfiresCalifornia cops saved 60 cats and dogs


     

  • West Virginia Lawmakers Could Impeach the Entire State Supreme Court      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 12:13:12 -0400

    West Virginia Lawmakers Could Impeach the Entire State Supreme CourtThe scandal is over $3.2 million in office renovations


    West Virginia Lawmakers Could Impeach the Entire State Supreme CourtThe scandal is over $3.2 million in office renovations


     

  • Controversial Theory Suggests Laziness Drove Ancient Humans to Extinction      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 16:39:00 -0400

    Controversial Theory Suggests Laziness Drove Ancient Humans to Extinction"They seemed to have thought, 'why bother?'"


    Controversial Theory Suggests Laziness Drove Ancient Humans to Extinction"They seemed to have thought, 'why bother?'"


     

  • Orchard raises $150 mln to expand after GSK gene therapy deal      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 08:08:19 -0400

    Orchard raises $150 mln to expand after GSK gene therapy dealAnglo-American biotech company Orchard Therapeutics has raised a further $150 million to fund its work in gene therapy, building on earlier fundraisings worth more than $140 million. The new financing comes four months after its acquisition of a portfolio of GlaxoSmithKline rare disease medicines, including the gene therapy Strimvelis for ADA severe combined immune deficiency (ADA-SCID), or "bubble baby" disease. Gene therapy is a hot area for drug research - highlighted by Novartis's $8.7 billion acquisition of AveXis in April - but products sold to Orchard are viewed as too niche for GSK as it refocuses its drug research under CEO Emma Walmsley.


    Orchard raises $150 mln to expand after GSK gene therapy dealAnglo-American biotech company Orchard Therapeutics has raised a further $150 million to fund its work in gene therapy, building on earlier fundraisings worth more than $140 million. The new financing comes four months after its acquisition of a portfolio of GlaxoSmithKline rare disease medicines, including the gene therapy Strimvelis for ADA severe combined immune deficiency (ADA-SCID), or "bubble baby" disease. Gene therapy is a hot area for drug research - highlighted by Novartis's $8.7 billion acquisition of AveXis in April - but products sold to Orchard are viewed as too niche for GSK as it refocuses its drug research under CEO Emma Walmsley.


     

  • Beyoncé Dedicates Detroit Concert to Ailing Aretha Franklin      Tue, 14 Aug 2018 02:03:36 -0400

    Beyoncé Dedicates Detroit Concert to Ailing Aretha FranklinBeyoncé dedicated her performance with husband, Jay Z, to the Queen of Soul drawing a roar from Aretha Franklin's hometown of Detroit


    Beyoncé Dedicates Detroit Concert to Ailing Aretha FranklinBeyoncé dedicated her performance with husband, Jay Z, to the Queen of Soul drawing a roar from Aretha Franklin's hometown of Detroit


     

  • President Trump Tweets Support for a Harley-Davidson Boycott      Sun, 12 Aug 2018 21:32:11 -0400

    President Trump Tweets Support for a Harley-Davidson BoycottHarley-Davidson has angered Trump with its plan to move manufacturing overseas


    President Trump Tweets Support for a Harley-Davidson BoycottHarley-Davidson has angered Trump with its plan to move manufacturing overseas


     

  • 'No One Can Obliterate Taiwan’s Existence.' President Tsai Ing-wen Defiant on U.S. Trip      Sun, 12 Aug 2018 23:07:24 -0400

    'No One Can Obliterate Taiwan’s Existence.' President Tsai Ing-wen Defiant on U.S. TripAs China ramps up efforts to scrub Taiwan from international recognition, the island’s President Tsai Ing-wen struck a defiant tone Sunday and vowed that “no one can obliterate Taiwan’s existence” before departing for the U.S.


    'No One Can Obliterate Taiwan’s Existence.' President Tsai Ing-wen Defiant on U.S. TripAs China ramps up efforts to scrub Taiwan from international recognition, the island’s President Tsai Ing-wen struck a defiant tone Sunday and vowed that “no one can obliterate Taiwan’s existence” before departing for the U.S.


     

  • White House called toxins contamination 'PR nightmare'      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 14:51:13 -0400

    White House called toxins contamination 'PR nightmare'HORSHAM, Pa. (AP) — Lauren Woeher wonders if her 16-month-old daughter has been harmed by tap water contaminated with toxic industrial compounds used in products like nonstick cookware, carpets, firefighting foam and fast-food wrappers. Henry Betz, at 76, rattles around his house alone at night, thinking about the water his family unknowingly drank for years that was tainted by the same contaminants, and the pancreatic cancers that killed wife Betty Jean and two others in his household.


    White House called toxins contamination 'PR nightmare'HORSHAM, Pa. (AP) — Lauren Woeher wonders if her 16-month-old daughter has been harmed by tap water contaminated with toxic industrial compounds used in products like nonstick cookware, carpets, firefighting foam and fast-food wrappers. Henry Betz, at 76, rattles around his house alone at night, thinking about the water his family unknowingly drank for years that was tainted by the same contaminants, and the pancreatic cancers that killed wife Betty Jean and two others in his household.


     

  • Here's Why People Are Using the Lobster Emoji to Rally for Transgender Representation      Mon, 13 Aug 2018 13:38:23 -0400

    Here's Why People Are Using the Lobster Emoji to Rally for Transgender RepresentationWhat you need to know about the campaign


    Here's Why People Are Using the Lobster Emoji to Rally for Transgender RepresentationWhat you need to know about the campaign


     



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