Home | SOAP Tools | UDDI Browser | ResourcesSource Code | RFCs | News Reader  | SOAP Interop | Bookmarks 

  

General
Reuters
CNN
Wired News
News.com
CBS News
NY Time
BBC
BBC World
Google News
Yahoo News
ABC News
Political Wire
WashingtonPost
WorldPress
US News
CS Monitor
Business
NY Time
CNN
Reuter
ABC News
CBS News
BBC Business
Forbes
Technology
CNET
CNN
Reuter
NY Time
WashingtonPost
Wired News
BBC
InfoWorld
InfoWorld WS
WebReference
LinuxToday
XML.com
XML Cover Pages
OASIS
W3C
Internet.com
JavaScript Tip
Linux Today
WDVL
CodeProject
SOAPAgent.com
Articles
Web Services
SOAP Resources
New Additions
Software Download
Most Popular
New Releases
Hot Title
Software Developer
Yahoo News
Top Stories
World
Business
Technology
Politics
Science
Sports
New York Times
Home Page
World
Business
Technology
Politics
Science
Sports
Reuters
Top News
World
Business
Technology
World News
CNN
CBS
WashingtonPost
RSS News Feeds
ChannelYahoo News - Latest News & Headlines    
RSS File: http://news.yahoo.com/rss/science
Description: The latest news and headlines from Yahoo! News. Get breaking news stories and in-depth coverage with videos and photos.
  • AP-NORC Poll: Disasters influence thinking on climate change      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 08:05:10 -0500

    AP-NORC Poll: Disasters influence thinking on climate changeWASHINGTON (AP) — When it comes to their views on climate change, Americans are looking at natural disasters and their local weather, according to a new poll.


    AP-NORC Poll: Disasters influence thinking on climate changeWASHINGTON (AP) — When it comes to their views on climate change, Americans are looking at natural disasters and their local weather, according to a new poll.


     

  • Halliburton profit beats on international demand, North America lags      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 07:54:40 -0500

    Halliburton profit beats on international demand, North America lagsClients in North America, Halliburton's biggest market by revenue, began pulling back on some drilling services last year amid transportation bottlenecks in the largest U.S. production region and after oil prices slid sharply in the fourth quarter. An oil glut and concerns about a global economic slowdown have pushed U.S. crude down about 30 percent since their October high to around $53 a barrel. Houston-based Halliburton said revenue from North America fell about 2 percent to $3.3 billion from a year earlier and dropped 11 percent from the third quarter.


    Halliburton profit beats on international demand, North America lagsClients in North America, Halliburton's biggest market by revenue, began pulling back on some drilling services last year amid transportation bottlenecks in the largest U.S. production region and after oil prices slid sharply in the fourth quarter. An oil glut and concerns about a global economic slowdown have pushed U.S. crude down about 30 percent since their October high to around $53 a barrel. Houston-based Halliburton said revenue from North America fell about 2 percent to $3.3 billion from a year earlier and dropped 11 percent from the third quarter.


     

  • Assad blocks access to Damascus for EU envoys: diplomats      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 07:41:10 -0500

    Assad blocks access to Damascus for EU envoys: diplomatsSince conflict broke out in Syria in 2011, the EU has used the Lebanese capital, the nearest major city, for its diplomatic base while closing most embassies in Damascus in protest over what they describe as Assad's brutal assault on the opposition. The EU diplomats who spoke on condition of anonymity said they believed it was an attempt to try to force European governments and the bloc to re-open embassies in Damascus, as the Syrian army, backed by Russian and Iranian forces, regains control of most of the country. "It's a serious problem for the EU's humanitarian assistance," said one EU diplomat.


    Assad blocks access to Damascus for EU envoys: diplomatsSince conflict broke out in Syria in 2011, the EU has used the Lebanese capital, the nearest major city, for its diplomatic base while closing most embassies in Damascus in protest over what they describe as Assad's brutal assault on the opposition. The EU diplomats who spoke on condition of anonymity said they believed it was an attempt to try to force European governments and the bloc to re-open embassies in Damascus, as the Syrian army, backed by Russian and Iranian forces, regains control of most of the country. "It's a serious problem for the EU's humanitarian assistance," said one EU diplomat.


     

  • Oil drops nearly 2 percent as China slowdown bites      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 07:19:29 -0500

    Oil drops nearly 2 percent as China slowdown bitesOil prices fell nearly 2 percent on Tuesday on signs that an economic slowdown in China is spreading, stoking concerns about global growth and fuel demand. The gloomy news from the world's second-largest economy and top oil importer pulled down financial markets across Asia. International Brent oil futures were down $1.23, or 1.96 percent, at $61.51 a barrel by 1205 GMT.


    Oil drops nearly 2 percent as China slowdown bitesOil prices fell nearly 2 percent on Tuesday on signs that an economic slowdown in China is spreading, stoking concerns about global growth and fuel demand. The gloomy news from the world's second-largest economy and top oil importer pulled down financial markets across Asia. International Brent oil futures were down $1.23, or 1.96 percent, at $61.51 a barrel by 1205 GMT.


     

  • Amazon reveals 'anti-robot vest' to protect workers from machines      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 07:06:28 -0500

    Amazon reveals 'anti-robot vest' to protect workers from machinesAmazon has given its warehouse workers new tech-enabled vests to protect them from robot-related crashes.  The e-commerce giant's new "Robot Tech Vest" is equipped with sensors to alert Amazon's robots to a human's presence forcing them to slow down to avoid collisions. The vests, which look similar to a utility belt, were designed to allow warehouse workers and engineers to easily retrieve fallen items within tightly packed aisles and repair robotic systems. Brad Porter, robotics vice president at Amazon, told TechCrunch that it replaces a previous system that required employees to block out areas of the warehouse where they planned to operate. "What the vest allows the robots to do is detect the human from farther away and smartly update its travel plan to steer clear without the need for the associate to explicitly mark out those zones," he said. The vests have been rolled out across 25 of Amazon's sites worldwide weeks after a robot accidentally hospitalised 24 of its human colleagues in the US after breaking open a pressurised can of bear repellent. Amazon has over a dozen warehouses in the UK and has invested heavily in expanding its staff numbers, many of whom work with its fleet of shelf-moving robots. However, the company has been subject to scrutiny over health and safety measures, after an FOI request made by the union GMB last year showed over 440 health and safety incidents at its UK warehouses since 2015.  At the time, Amazon said it was a safe place to work and that reports to the contrary were "simply wrong". The company has not yet confirmed whether it has rolled the vests out across its sites in the UK.


    Amazon reveals 'anti-robot vest' to protect workers from machinesAmazon has given its warehouse workers new tech-enabled vests to protect them from robot-related crashes.  The e-commerce giant's new "Robot Tech Vest" is equipped with sensors to alert Amazon's robots to a human's presence forcing them to slow down to avoid collisions. The vests, which look similar to a utility belt, were designed to allow warehouse workers and engineers to easily retrieve fallen items within tightly packed aisles and repair robotic systems. Brad Porter, robotics vice president at Amazon, told TechCrunch that it replaces a previous system that required employees to block out areas of the warehouse where they planned to operate. "What the vest allows the robots to do is detect the human from farther away and smartly update its travel plan to steer clear without the need for the associate to explicitly mark out those zones," he said. The vests have been rolled out across 25 of Amazon's sites worldwide weeks after a robot accidentally hospitalised 24 of its human colleagues in the US after breaking open a pressurised can of bear repellent. Amazon has over a dozen warehouses in the UK and has invested heavily in expanding its staff numbers, many of whom work with its fleet of shelf-moving robots. However, the company has been subject to scrutiny over health and safety measures, after an FOI request made by the union GMB last year showed over 440 health and safety incidents at its UK warehouses since 2015.  At the time, Amazon said it was a safe place to work and that reports to the contrary were "simply wrong". The company has not yet confirmed whether it has rolled the vests out across its sites in the UK.


     

  • Man with 'Alice in Wonderland Syndrome' Watches Computer Icons Leap Off Screen      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 06:54:40 -0500

    Man with 'Alice in Wonderland Syndrome' Watches Computer Icons Leap Off ScreenAt first, the man couldn't believe his eyes. The icons on his desktop computer were slowly jumping out of his monitor, hovering in the space between him and the screen. For 10 minutes, these icons wavered in his vision before eventually disappearing off to his right side. These strange symptoms and others sent the 54-year-old man to the emergency room, where doctors soon diagnosed him with a curious malady called Alice in Wonderland Syndrome,, according to a recent report of the man's case. [Image Gallery: Slicing Through the Brain] Typically, Alice in Wonderland Syndrome is triggered by causes including epilepsy, drug intoxication, migraines, psychiatric diseases and infections, the doctors said. But the man's episode is the first known case of the syndrome being caused by a glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer, the doctors wrote in the report, which was published online Jan. 2 the the journal Neurocase. Just like it sounds, the name Alice in Wonderland Syndrome was taken from the trippy but classic book by Lewis Carroll. Just as the hookah-smoking Caterpillar tells Alice, "One side will make you grow taller, and the other side will make you grow shorter," in reference to a mushroom, people with this syndrome may have "an erroneous perception of their own body, affecting both size and position in the space, as well as alteration of the surrounding environment," the doctors wrote in the report. In the man's case, his Alice in Wonderland episode was followed by a pulsating headache, nausea and extreme sensitivity to light. During their examination of the man, the doctors learned that he experienced monthly migraines and that he had a family history of brain tumors. However, a neurological exam was unremarkable, as were an electroencephalography (EEG) and a computed tomography (CT) scan of the man's brain. Perplexed, the doctors transferred the man to the neurology department, where he underwent yet another test, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. This scan revealed the culprit; an inch-long (2.5 centimeters) lesion in the left temporal-occipital region of his brain, which turned out to be a glioblastoma. The temporal-occipital region of the brain is involved with spatial perception and orientation. It makes sense, therefore, that a lesion there would make the man see strange visions, said Dr. Sylvia Kurz, a neuro-oncologist at the Brain Tumor Center, which is part of the Perlmutter Cancer Center at New York University's Langone Medical Center. Kurz was not involved with the man's case. "What I see in my everyday life is that brain tumors can present any kind of neurological symptom, depending on where the tumor is located," Kurz told Live Science. Migraines can also visual symptoms, but in the man's case, the doctors were able to them rule out because the man said he never experienced with migraines with auras. Auras refer to a blurry or zigzag-like visual perception that some people experience when they have migraines. [Senses and Non-Sense: 7 Odd Hallucinations] Kurz commended the doctors for their detailed exam of the man. "Even if a patient has a long-standing history of headaches, if there's something new about a headache or something that has never occurred with this headache, it always warrants a very thorough evaluation," Kurz said. "And the most detailed evaluation of the brain from an imaging perspective is really a brain MRI scan." Kurz added that because glioblastomas grow quickly, it's likely that the tumor had formed within the past few months before he saw the computer icons leap off the screen. The patient immediately had surgery to remove the tumor with a laser, and continued treatment with a regimen of chemotherapy and radiation. About one year later, the man was back at the hospital for another operation after his tumor came back in the same spot. But so far, the treatment has worked. Twenty months after the Alice in Wonderland Syndrome episode, the man is doing well, with no evidence of the glioblastoma, the doctors said. (The median survival time for glioblastoma is 11 to 15 months, according to the American Brain Tumor Association.) * Inside the Brain: A Photo Journey Through Time * 3D Images: Exploring the Human Brain * Image Gallery: Einstein's Brain Originally published on Live Science.


    Man with 'Alice in Wonderland Syndrome' Watches Computer Icons Leap Off ScreenAt first, the man couldn't believe his eyes. The icons on his desktop computer were slowly jumping out of his monitor, hovering in the space between him and the screen. For 10 minutes, these icons wavered in his vision before eventually disappearing off to his right side. These strange symptoms and others sent the 54-year-old man to the emergency room, where doctors soon diagnosed him with a curious malady called Alice in Wonderland Syndrome,, according to a recent report of the man's case. [Image Gallery: Slicing Through the Brain] Typically, Alice in Wonderland Syndrome is triggered by causes including epilepsy, drug intoxication, migraines, psychiatric diseases and infections, the doctors said. But the man's episode is the first known case of the syndrome being caused by a glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer, the doctors wrote in the report, which was published online Jan. 2 the the journal Neurocase. Just like it sounds, the name Alice in Wonderland Syndrome was taken from the trippy but classic book by Lewis Carroll. Just as the hookah-smoking Caterpillar tells Alice, "One side will make you grow taller, and the other side will make you grow shorter," in reference to a mushroom, people with this syndrome may have "an erroneous perception of their own body, affecting both size and position in the space, as well as alteration of the surrounding environment," the doctors wrote in the report. In the man's case, his Alice in Wonderland episode was followed by a pulsating headache, nausea and extreme sensitivity to light. During their examination of the man, the doctors learned that he experienced monthly migraines and that he had a family history of brain tumors. However, a neurological exam was unremarkable, as were an electroencephalography (EEG) and a computed tomography (CT) scan of the man's brain. Perplexed, the doctors transferred the man to the neurology department, where he underwent yet another test, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. This scan revealed the culprit; an inch-long (2.5 centimeters) lesion in the left temporal-occipital region of his brain, which turned out to be a glioblastoma. The temporal-occipital region of the brain is involved with spatial perception and orientation. It makes sense, therefore, that a lesion there would make the man see strange visions, said Dr. Sylvia Kurz, a neuro-oncologist at the Brain Tumor Center, which is part of the Perlmutter Cancer Center at New York University's Langone Medical Center. Kurz was not involved with the man's case. "What I see in my everyday life is that brain tumors can present any kind of neurological symptom, depending on where the tumor is located," Kurz told Live Science. Migraines can also visual symptoms, but in the man's case, the doctors were able to them rule out because the man said he never experienced with migraines with auras. Auras refer to a blurry or zigzag-like visual perception that some people experience when they have migraines. [Senses and Non-Sense: 7 Odd Hallucinations] Kurz commended the doctors for their detailed exam of the man. "Even if a patient has a long-standing history of headaches, if there's something new about a headache or something that has never occurred with this headache, it always warrants a very thorough evaluation," Kurz said. "And the most detailed evaluation of the brain from an imaging perspective is really a brain MRI scan." Kurz added that because glioblastomas grow quickly, it's likely that the tumor had formed within the past few months before he saw the computer icons leap off the screen. The patient immediately had surgery to remove the tumor with a laser, and continued treatment with a regimen of chemotherapy and radiation. About one year later, the man was back at the hospital for another operation after his tumor came back in the same spot. But so far, the treatment has worked. Twenty months after the Alice in Wonderland Syndrome episode, the man is doing well, with no evidence of the glioblastoma, the doctors said. (The median survival time for glioblastoma is 11 to 15 months, according to the American Brain Tumor Association.) * Inside the Brain: A Photo Journey Through Time * 3D Images: Exploring the Human Brain * Image Gallery: Einstein's Brain Originally published on Live Science.


     

  • Never mind climate change, Davos prefers private jets      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 06:45:41 -0500

    Never mind climate change, Davos prefers private jetsThe Davos elite say they are more worried than ever about climate change. The convenience and comfort of flying privately rather than commercially appears to outweigh any concerns about the outsized carbon footprint it involves, judging by a number-crunching exercise by the company Air Charter Service (ACS). It forecast nearly 1,500 private jet flights over the week of the World Economic Forum (WEF) to airports near Davos in the Swiss Alps.


    Never mind climate change, Davos prefers private jetsThe Davos elite say they are more worried than ever about climate change. The convenience and comfort of flying privately rather than commercially appears to outweigh any concerns about the outsized carbon footprint it involves, judging by a number-crunching exercise by the company Air Charter Service (ACS). It forecast nearly 1,500 private jet flights over the week of the World Economic Forum (WEF) to airports near Davos in the Swiss Alps.


     

  • Italy's Salvini says France has no interest in stabilizing Libya      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 06:29:33 -0500

    Italy's Salvini says France has no interest in stabilizing LibyaRelations between Italy and France, traditionally close allies, have grown frosty since the far-right League and anti-establishment 5-Star Movement formed a coalition last year and took aim at pro-EU French President Emmanuel Macron. France's Foreign Ministry and the French president's office declined to respond immediately. On Monday France summoned Italy's ambassador after Salvini's fellow deputy prime minister, Luigi Di Maio, accused Paris of creating poverty in Africa and generating mass migration to Europe.


    Italy's Salvini says France has no interest in stabilizing LibyaRelations between Italy and France, traditionally close allies, have grown frosty since the far-right League and anti-establishment 5-Star Movement formed a coalition last year and took aim at pro-EU French President Emmanuel Macron. France's Foreign Ministry and the French president's office declined to respond immediately. On Monday France summoned Italy's ambassador after Salvini's fellow deputy prime minister, Luigi Di Maio, accused Paris of creating poverty in Africa and generating mass migration to Europe.


     

  • U.S. insulin costs per patient nearly doubled from 2012 to 2016: study      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 06:06:38 -0500

    U.S. insulin costs per patient nearly doubled from 2012 to 2016: studyA person with type 1 diabetes incurred annual insulin costs of $5,705, on average, in 2016. The average cost was roughly half that at $2,864 per patient in 2012, according to a report due to be released on Tuesday by the nonprofit Health Care Cost Institute (HCCI). The figures represent the combined amount paid by a patient and their health plan for the medicine and do not reflect rebates paid at a later date.


    U.S. insulin costs per patient nearly doubled from 2012 to 2016: studyA person with type 1 diabetes incurred annual insulin costs of $5,705, on average, in 2016. The average cost was roughly half that at $2,864 per patient in 2012, according to a report due to be released on Tuesday by the nonprofit Health Care Cost Institute (HCCI). The figures represent the combined amount paid by a patient and their health plan for the medicine and do not reflect rebates paid at a later date.


     

  • Apple Concedes That Qualcomm Was the Only 4G-Ready Chip Source      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 06:00:00 -0500

    Apple Concedes That Qualcomm Was the Only 4G-Ready Chip SourceThe admission on Jan. 18 by Matthias Sauer, Apple’s director of cellular systems architecture, is the kind of point Qualcomm will have to score in front of U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh as it continues its defense against antitrust allegations by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission. The government has charged it with using market dominance in smartphone chips to force phone makers to pay inflated patent licensing revenue. Sauer testified that Apple considered the likes of Ericsson, Broadcom and Intel Corp. as component suppliers for devices as early as the 2012 planning phase for new products, but none could deliver to Apple’s desired specifications.


    Apple Concedes That Qualcomm Was the Only 4G-Ready Chip SourceThe admission on Jan. 18 by Matthias Sauer, Apple’s director of cellular systems architecture, is the kind of point Qualcomm will have to score in front of U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh as it continues its defense against antitrust allegations by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission. The government has charged it with using market dominance in smartphone chips to force phone makers to pay inflated patent licensing revenue. Sauer testified that Apple considered the likes of Ericsson, Broadcom and Intel Corp. as component suppliers for devices as early as the 2012 planning phase for new products, but none could deliver to Apple’s desired specifications.


     

  • Gene Scientist Fired by College as China Says He Broke the Law      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 05:48:13 -0500

    Gene Scientist Fired by College as China Says He Broke the LawThe Chinese scientist who altered the genes of twin baby girls as embryos was fired by his university after a government probe found he violated laws and signaled he may face a criminal investigation. A local government investigation found he breached China’s laws and ethics and will be “severely” dealt with, state-run Xinhua reported the same day. The firing is the latest blow for He, who triggered an international backlash when he shocked the world with his claims of genetically-altering human embryos that resulted in births.


    Gene Scientist Fired by College as China Says He Broke the LawThe Chinese scientist who altered the genes of twin baby girls as embryos was fired by his university after a government probe found he violated laws and signaled he may face a criminal investigation. A local government investigation found he breached China’s laws and ethics and will be “severely” dealt with, state-run Xinhua reported the same day. The firing is the latest blow for He, who triggered an international backlash when he shocked the world with his claims of genetically-altering human embryos that resulted in births.


     

  • Amazon Go, One Year Old, Has Attracted a Host of Cashierless Imitators      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 05:00:27 -0500

    Amazon Go, One Year Old, Has Attracted a Host of Cashierless ImitatorsThe Seattle startup went so far as to open a Detroit office to cozy up to the auto industry. A few months later, Mighty AI signed a deal to do just that, joining the race to help brick-and-mortar retailers keep pace with Amazon.com Inc. A year ago, the e-commerce giant opened a cashierless convenience store called Amazon Go, marking its biggest effort yet to change the way people shop in the physical world.


    Amazon Go, One Year Old, Has Attracted a Host of Cashierless ImitatorsThe Seattle startup went so far as to open a Detroit office to cozy up to the auto industry. A few months later, Mighty AI signed a deal to do just that, joining the race to help brick-and-mortar retailers keep pace with Amazon.com Inc. A year ago, the e-commerce giant opened a cashierless convenience store called Amazon Go, marking its biggest effort yet to change the way people shop in the physical world.


     

  • TomTom Sells Telematics Unit to Bridgestone for $1 Billion      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 04:51:01 -0500

    TomTom Sells Telematics Unit to Bridgestone for $1 BillionThe sale is a big step in TomTom’s shift to location technology as customers ditch the personal navigation devices that made the company a household name in favor of smartphones. In September, the Dutch company said it was exploring a sale of Telematics, which delivers vehicle-related data and intelligence for fleet management and connected car services. Media reports also identified Verizon Communications Inc., Microsoft Corp., Daimler AG, and Michelin as possible bidders for the unit.


    TomTom Sells Telematics Unit to Bridgestone for $1 BillionThe sale is a big step in TomTom’s shift to location technology as customers ditch the personal navigation devices that made the company a household name in favor of smartphones. In September, the Dutch company said it was exploring a sale of Telematics, which delivers vehicle-related data and intelligence for fleet management and connected car services. Media reports also identified Verizon Communications Inc., Microsoft Corp., Daimler AG, and Michelin as possible bidders for the unit.


     

  • Farewell to the 727, the ‘earth-trembling’ workhorse that brought air travel to millions      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 04:35:36 -0500

    Farewell to the 727, the ‘earth-trembling’ workhorse that brought air travel to millionsOne of the aircraft that introduced the fundamentals of modern comfort and convenience to millions of travellers has flown its last passenger service. The Boeing 727 might not have been responsible for the dawn of the jet age, but its record-breaking popularity in the Sixties and Seventies was testament to the seachange it helped force when it became the stalwart of some of the world’s largest airlines. After its 1963 debut, it was the first Boeing commercial plane to sell more than 1,000 units - and the manufacturer’s only trijet. “What a transformation,” Dan Hagedorn, curator at Seattle’s Museum of Flight, told the Seattle Times, of the plane’s passenger experience. “It was like going to the moon - it was that different for the travelling public.” At a time when those flying for the first time did so either in large jets (such as the 707) or smaller propellor aircraft, the 727, capable of carrying up to 189 passengers, was the first jet airliner to bring speed, style and comfort to mid-sized towns and cities, flying in and out of smaller airports with shorter runways. The 727 was Boeing's only plane with three engines Credit: getty Favoured by US airlines to serve its domestic routes, though used in Europe by the likes of Alitalia, Lufthansa and Air France, the three-engine aircraft was designed with shorter runways in mind and to open up new short- and medium-haul commuter markets. Bob Bogash, a former Boeing engineer, said of the 727: “It was a big leap forward.” Its story is now over, with the last 727 in commercial service flying its final scheduled passenger flight earlier this month. The 38-year-old Boeing 727-200, owned by Iran Aseman Airlines, touched down in Tehran ahead of its retirement, two hours after taking off from Zahedan. In recent years the aircraft, which in its heyday would have featured tiny (by today’s standards) overhead bins, ashtrays in arm rests and unwieldy drinks trolleys (likely with a free and well-stocked bar), has become harder to find, with fewer and fewer carriers flying it. Its use became mainly reserved for cargo operators, militaries and private jets.. With 1,832 aircraft sold, and millions of passengers carried, the 727 had become more and more expensive to maintain and run, its gas-guzzling trio of engines inefficient compared to today’s twin-engine jets. Only cargo, military and private 727s remain Credit: getty Those three engines were famously loud, with many of the aircraft flown in recent years fitted with “hush kits” to allow them to meet noise regulations. Even then, in 2010, a number of Australian airports banned the aircraft altogether from their runways. Writing for Disciples of Flight, pilot and author Erika Armstrong said the 727’s Pratt and Whitney engines “made the earth tremble, set off car alarms and triggered many noise abatement fines”. Despite the racket, pilots enjoyed flying the 727. “Oh, I loved it,” said Captain Molly Flanagan, at the ceremony for retiring the first ever model in 2016. “It was great. It was fast, sleek and challenging to fly.” But perhaps the world’s most famous fan of the 727 was Donald Trump, long before he was president, who had one as his private jet before upgrading in 2009 to a larger 757. Another high-profile user, in a rather different respect, was the infamous DB Cooper. Where planes go to die: extraordinary aircraft graveyards As we’ve heard, the 727 was born to serve smaller cities and destinations not yet covered by the nascent jet industry. To do this, it was developed to be relatively self-sufficient, in such a way that it did not need ground facilities. It had its own auxiliary power unit, for example, which allowed electrical systems and air conditioning to run without the need for a ground supply. Another of its quirks was its built-in staircase at its aft, negating the need for airport steps, but also allowing, at first, an escape route. Enter DB Cooper. It was Cooper (or so he is known) who hijacked a 727 in 1971 and, after extorting $200,000 ($1.2m today) in ransom money, had the pilots fly the plane at 10,000 feet before locking the crew on the flight deck, lowering the back staircase and parachuting into history, never to be found. Cooper’s escapes - and the attempts of dozens more - led to the introduction of the Cooper vane that prevented the staircase from being opened in flight. The rear stairs also made the 727 the airline of choice for the CIA when it came to dropping agents and supplies behind enemy lines in the Vietnam War. Trump's former private jet was a 727 Credit: getty It was also an 727 that featured in 2012 TV experiment, The Plane Crash, on Channel 4. In the programme a former Singapore Airlines aircraft was flown by remote control before being deliberately crashed in Mexico – not a positive indicator of a plane’s place in the market.  And so, after a colourful history, the 727 is all-but laid to rest as the world enters a new era of aviation and the public loses touch with another aircraft that, just 60 years ago, introduced flying to the world. Five more aircraft disappearing from the skies Boeing 747 The 747 will remain in the sky for some time to come – a remarkable 1,547 have been built and delivered since 1966 - including five this year, all bound for logistics behemoth UPS - and they remain an important part of countless airline fleets, including that of British Airways, which owns 36 jumbo jets (more than any other carrier bar Atlas Air), and Virgin Atlantic, which has eight. A little over 500 are still in service and the oldest “active” 747, according to the website Airfleets.net, made its maiden flight on July 13, 1969 (exactly one week before man first set foot on the moon) and belongs to Iran’s Caspian Airlines. But they are slowly being phased out. BA has retired five in the last 12 months and said the model will be gone from its hangers by 2024. Last year United waved goodbye to its final 747, with a farewell flight from San Francisco to Honolulu (recreating the route of its first 747 service in 1970), as did its US rival Delta. KLM has binned two in 2018 (last year we reported on the final flight of one of its jumbos, registration PH-BFR, which was greeted on the runway by a herd of deer). Before long this iconic aircraft, the world’s biggest passenger plane for 37 years, will be the preserve of the planet’s smaller airlines and cargo companies. At a glance | The 747's biggest operators Fokker 100/70 The largest aircraft built by Dutch manufacturer Fokker before it declared bankruptcy in 1996, the Fokker 100 and its smaller sibling, the Fokker 70, are rapidly disappearing from the skies. KLM, the world’s oldest airline and for decades its biggest customer, retired its final Fokker in October 2017, and only around a dozen of either model are still flying in Europe (Helvetic Airways, based in Switzerland, is the continent’s biggest Fokker operator, with five). Virgin Australia Regional Airlines still uses the Fokker 100 (it has 14), but is planning to replace them with ATRs. Other airlines still flying the Dutch aircraft include Iran Air (3), Papua New Guinea's Air Niugini (7), and Air Panama (5). McDonnell Douglas DC-9 McDonnell Douglas has been defunct since 1997, but its aircraft can still be seen, though in ever decreasing numbers. Almost 1,000 DC-9s were built, but only 36 are still in the sky, almost all of which are running cargo services. Until this year passengers with LASER Airlines, based in Venezuela, could board a DC-9. But now it only operates the equally venerable MD-80 (more on which below). Fly SAX, based in Kenya, still has one, however. It is 52 years old and can still be seen hopping between the country’s airports. Ilyushin Il-18 This turboprop was one of the most iconic Soviet airliners - at a time when the sprawling country’s questionable air safety record was something of a running joke - but has been out of production since 1985. In the last five years it has disappeared from the fleets of Aeroflot and Rossiya Airlines, as well as a clutch of Cuban airlines. In fact, our research suggests that only two carriers still fly them. Sri Lanka’s FitsAir, which has one for cargo services, and Air Koryo, North Korea’s national airline, often rated the world’s worst, which also owns one, but only uses it for domestic services.   McDonnell Douglas DC-3 In 2017 Telegraph Travel went on the hunt for the oldest passenger plane still in service. We thought we’d found it, but were subsequently pointed in the direction of Buffalo Airlines, a family-run Canadian carrier. It owns six DC-3s, a model that has been out of service since 1950. Scheduled passenger flights have been suspended, but they are available for charter services.


    Farewell to the 727, the ‘earth-trembling’ workhorse that brought air travel to millionsOne of the aircraft that introduced the fundamentals of modern comfort and convenience to millions of travellers has flown its last passenger service. The Boeing 727 might not have been responsible for the dawn of the jet age, but its record-breaking popularity in the Sixties and Seventies was testament to the seachange it helped force when it became the stalwart of some of the world’s largest airlines. After its 1963 debut, it was the first Boeing commercial plane to sell more than 1,000 units - and the manufacturer’s only trijet. “What a transformation,” Dan Hagedorn, curator at Seattle’s Museum of Flight, told the Seattle Times, of the plane’s passenger experience. “It was like going to the moon - it was that different for the travelling public.” At a time when those flying for the first time did so either in large jets (such as the 707) or smaller propellor aircraft, the 727, capable of carrying up to 189 passengers, was the first jet airliner to bring speed, style and comfort to mid-sized towns and cities, flying in and out of smaller airports with shorter runways. The 727 was Boeing's only plane with three engines Credit: getty Favoured by US airlines to serve its domestic routes, though used in Europe by the likes of Alitalia, Lufthansa and Air France, the three-engine aircraft was designed with shorter runways in mind and to open up new short- and medium-haul commuter markets. Bob Bogash, a former Boeing engineer, said of the 727: “It was a big leap forward.” Its story is now over, with the last 727 in commercial service flying its final scheduled passenger flight earlier this month. The 38-year-old Boeing 727-200, owned by Iran Aseman Airlines, touched down in Tehran ahead of its retirement, two hours after taking off from Zahedan. In recent years the aircraft, which in its heyday would have featured tiny (by today’s standards) overhead bins, ashtrays in arm rests and unwieldy drinks trolleys (likely with a free and well-stocked bar), has become harder to find, with fewer and fewer carriers flying it. Its use became mainly reserved for cargo operators, militaries and private jets.. With 1,832 aircraft sold, and millions of passengers carried, the 727 had become more and more expensive to maintain and run, its gas-guzzling trio of engines inefficient compared to today’s twin-engine jets. Only cargo, military and private 727s remain Credit: getty Those three engines were famously loud, with many of the aircraft flown in recent years fitted with “hush kits” to allow them to meet noise regulations. Even then, in 2010, a number of Australian airports banned the aircraft altogether from their runways. Writing for Disciples of Flight, pilot and author Erika Armstrong said the 727’s Pratt and Whitney engines “made the earth tremble, set off car alarms and triggered many noise abatement fines”. Despite the racket, pilots enjoyed flying the 727. “Oh, I loved it,” said Captain Molly Flanagan, at the ceremony for retiring the first ever model in 2016. “It was great. It was fast, sleek and challenging to fly.” But perhaps the world’s most famous fan of the 727 was Donald Trump, long before he was president, who had one as his private jet before upgrading in 2009 to a larger 757. Another high-profile user, in a rather different respect, was the infamous DB Cooper. Where planes go to die: extraordinary aircraft graveyards As we’ve heard, the 727 was born to serve smaller cities and destinations not yet covered by the nascent jet industry. To do this, it was developed to be relatively self-sufficient, in such a way that it did not need ground facilities. It had its own auxiliary power unit, for example, which allowed electrical systems and air conditioning to run without the need for a ground supply. Another of its quirks was its built-in staircase at its aft, negating the need for airport steps, but also allowing, at first, an escape route. Enter DB Cooper. It was Cooper (or so he is known) who hijacked a 727 in 1971 and, after extorting $200,000 ($1.2m today) in ransom money, had the pilots fly the plane at 10,000 feet before locking the crew on the flight deck, lowering the back staircase and parachuting into history, never to be found. Cooper’s escapes - and the attempts of dozens more - led to the introduction of the Cooper vane that prevented the staircase from being opened in flight. The rear stairs also made the 727 the airline of choice for the CIA when it came to dropping agents and supplies behind enemy lines in the Vietnam War. Trump's former private jet was a 727 Credit: getty It was also an 727 that featured in 2012 TV experiment, The Plane Crash, on Channel 4. In the programme a former Singapore Airlines aircraft was flown by remote control before being deliberately crashed in Mexico – not a positive indicator of a plane’s place in the market.  And so, after a colourful history, the 727 is all-but laid to rest as the world enters a new era of aviation and the public loses touch with another aircraft that, just 60 years ago, introduced flying to the world. Five more aircraft disappearing from the skies Boeing 747 The 747 will remain in the sky for some time to come – a remarkable 1,547 have been built and delivered since 1966 - including five this year, all bound for logistics behemoth UPS - and they remain an important part of countless airline fleets, including that of British Airways, which owns 36 jumbo jets (more than any other carrier bar Atlas Air), and Virgin Atlantic, which has eight. A little over 500 are still in service and the oldest “active” 747, according to the website Airfleets.net, made its maiden flight on July 13, 1969 (exactly one week before man first set foot on the moon) and belongs to Iran’s Caspian Airlines. But they are slowly being phased out. BA has retired five in the last 12 months and said the model will be gone from its hangers by 2024. Last year United waved goodbye to its final 747, with a farewell flight from San Francisco to Honolulu (recreating the route of its first 747 service in 1970), as did its US rival Delta. KLM has binned two in 2018 (last year we reported on the final flight of one of its jumbos, registration PH-BFR, which was greeted on the runway by a herd of deer). Before long this iconic aircraft, the world’s biggest passenger plane for 37 years, will be the preserve of the planet’s smaller airlines and cargo companies. At a glance | The 747's biggest operators Fokker 100/70 The largest aircraft built by Dutch manufacturer Fokker before it declared bankruptcy in 1996, the Fokker 100 and its smaller sibling, the Fokker 70, are rapidly disappearing from the skies. KLM, the world’s oldest airline and for decades its biggest customer, retired its final Fokker in October 2017, and only around a dozen of either model are still flying in Europe (Helvetic Airways, based in Switzerland, is the continent’s biggest Fokker operator, with five). Virgin Australia Regional Airlines still uses the Fokker 100 (it has 14), but is planning to replace them with ATRs. Other airlines still flying the Dutch aircraft include Iran Air (3), Papua New Guinea's Air Niugini (7), and Air Panama (5). McDonnell Douglas DC-9 McDonnell Douglas has been defunct since 1997, but its aircraft can still be seen, though in ever decreasing numbers. Almost 1,000 DC-9s were built, but only 36 are still in the sky, almost all of which are running cargo services. Until this year passengers with LASER Airlines, based in Venezuela, could board a DC-9. But now it only operates the equally venerable MD-80 (more on which below). Fly SAX, based in Kenya, still has one, however. It is 52 years old and can still be seen hopping between the country’s airports. Ilyushin Il-18 This turboprop was one of the most iconic Soviet airliners - at a time when the sprawling country’s questionable air safety record was something of a running joke - but has been out of production since 1985. In the last five years it has disappeared from the fleets of Aeroflot and Rossiya Airlines, as well as a clutch of Cuban airlines. In fact, our research suggests that only two carriers still fly them. Sri Lanka’s FitsAir, which has one for cargo services, and Air Koryo, North Korea’s national airline, often rated the world’s worst, which also owns one, but only uses it for domestic services.   McDonnell Douglas DC-3 In 2017 Telegraph Travel went on the hunt for the oldest passenger plane still in service. We thought we’d found it, but were subsequently pointed in the direction of Buffalo Airlines, a family-run Canadian carrier. It owns six DC-3s, a model that has been out of service since 1950. Scheduled passenger flights have been suspended, but they are available for charter services.


     

  • Toyota, Panasonic announce venture for green auto batteries      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 04:30:01 -0500

    Toyota, Panasonic announce venture for green auto batteriesTOKYO (AP) — Toyota Motor Corp. and Panasonic Corp. are setting up a joint venture to research, manufacture and sell batteries for ecological autos, an increasingly lucrative sector amid concerns about global warming.


    Toyota, Panasonic announce venture for green auto batteriesTOKYO (AP) — Toyota Motor Corp. and Panasonic Corp. are setting up a joint venture to research, manufacture and sell batteries for ecological autos, an increasingly lucrative sector amid concerns about global warming.


     

  • Starbucks Expands Uber Delivery Venture to San Francisco, London      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 04:07:49 -0500

    Starbucks Expands Uber Delivery Venture to San Francisco, LondonThe service will start in San Francisco on Tuesday, to be followed by Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York and Washington D.C. “in the coming weeks.” Starbucks is planning to bring delivery service to nearly a quarter of U.S.-owned stores in seven cities this spring, the company said in a statement Tuesday. Almost all of Starbucks’ menu items will be available with delivery times of within 30 minutes -- and an initial $2.49 booking fee. The coffee chain is planning to test delivery programs in other countries this year, with London being the first European city targeted for a pilot later this month.


    Starbucks Expands Uber Delivery Venture to San Francisco, LondonThe service will start in San Francisco on Tuesday, to be followed by Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York and Washington D.C. “in the coming weeks.” Starbucks is planning to bring delivery service to nearly a quarter of U.S.-owned stores in seven cities this spring, the company said in a statement Tuesday. Almost all of Starbucks’ menu items will be available with delivery times of within 30 minutes -- and an initial $2.49 booking fee. The coffee chain is planning to test delivery programs in other countries this year, with London being the first European city targeted for a pilot later this month.


     

  • Corporate America Tallies the Mounting Costs of Climate Change      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 04:00:00 -0500

    Corporate America Tallies the Mounting Costs of Climate ChangeThe Walt Disney Co. is concerned its theme parks will get too hot for vacationers, while AT&T Inc. fears hurricanes and wildfires may knock out its cell towers. The Coca-Cola Co. wonders if there will still be enough water to make Coke. The documents reveal how widely climate change is expected to cascade through the economy -- disrupting supply chains, disabling operations and driving away customers, but also offering new ways to make money.


    Corporate America Tallies the Mounting Costs of Climate ChangeThe Walt Disney Co. is concerned its theme parks will get too hot for vacationers, while AT&T Inc. fears hurricanes and wildfires may knock out its cell towers. The Coca-Cola Co. wonders if there will still be enough water to make Coke. The documents reveal how widely climate change is expected to cascade through the economy -- disrupting supply chains, disabling operations and driving away customers, but also offering new ways to make money.


     

  • 'A List' climate change firms outperform on stock market - survey      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 03:54:56 -0500

    'A List' climate change firms outperform on stock market - surveyApple , L'Oreal and Mitsubishi Electric <6503.T> are among more than 120 global firms which scored top marks in a ranking of corporate efforts to slow climate change. Many companies say they are stepping up action on climate change since almost 200 governments struck the 2015 Paris climate agreement to phase out greenhouse gas emissions this century by shifting from fossil fuels. London-based CDP, formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project, said its data showed the shares of its index leaders tend to outperform on stock markets.


    'A List' climate change firms outperform on stock market - surveyApple , L'Oreal and Mitsubishi Electric <6503.T> are among more than 120 global firms which scored top marks in a ranking of corporate efforts to slow climate change. Many companies say they are stepping up action on climate change since almost 200 governments struck the 2015 Paris climate agreement to phase out greenhouse gas emissions this century by shifting from fossil fuels. London-based CDP, formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project, said its data showed the shares of its index leaders tend to outperform on stock markets.


     

  • U.S. Still Seeking Huawei CFO's Extradition, Canada Envoy Says      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 03:00:32 -0500

    U.S. Still Seeking Huawei CFO's Extradition, Canada Envoy SaysAmbassador David MacNaughton confirmed in an email Monday that U.S. officials have continued to signal an intent to follow through on the case against Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou. The Globe and Mail newspaper earlier cited an interview with MacNaughton saying that the U.S. has notified the Canadian government of plans to file a formal extradition request before a Jan. 30 deadline.


    U.S. Still Seeking Huawei CFO's Extradition, Canada Envoy SaysAmbassador David MacNaughton confirmed in an email Monday that U.S. officials have continued to signal an intent to follow through on the case against Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou. The Globe and Mail newspaper earlier cited an interview with MacNaughton saying that the U.S. has notified the Canadian government of plans to file a formal extradition request before a Jan. 30 deadline.


     

  • How China Plans to Kill Stealth (Think No More F-22, F-35 or B-2 Bombers)      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 02:49:00 -0500

    How China Plans to Kill Stealth (Think No More F-22, F-35 or B-2 Bombers)Thanks to quantum radars?


    How China Plans to Kill Stealth (Think No More F-22, F-35 or B-2 Bombers)Thanks to quantum radars?


     

  • China approves third batch of video games; Tencent still absent      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 02:33:30 -0500

    China approves third batch of video games; Tencent still absentThe State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television approved 93 games in its third list since December, with Tencent's domestic rival NetEase Inc also absent for the third time. China is home to the world's largest video game market, where 620 million players spent $37.9 billion last year mostly on mobile and PC games, showed data from gaming market researcher Newzoo. Tencent's share price subsequently tumbled, wiping billions of dollars from the stock's market value.


    China approves third batch of video games; Tencent still absentThe State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television approved 93 games in its third list since December, with Tencent's domestic rival NetEase Inc also absent for the third time. China is home to the world's largest video game market, where 620 million players spent $37.9 billion last year mostly on mobile and PC games, showed data from gaming market researcher Newzoo. Tencent's share price subsequently tumbled, wiping billions of dollars from the stock's market value.


     

  • Tesla says it has no agreement with Chinese battery maker Lishen      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 01:43:14 -0500

    Tesla says it has no agreement with Chinese battery maker LishenTesla Inc denied on Tuesday that it had signed a preliminary agreement with Tianjin Lishen to supply batteries for its new Shanghai car factory, saying it had received quotes from the Chinese battery maker but did not proceed further. "We have not signed any agreement of any kind with them," a Tesla spokeswoman told Reuters. Reuters earlier on Tuesday reported, citing two sources with direct knowledge of the matter, that Tesla and Lishen had signed a preliminary agreement and were working on the details.


    Tesla says it has no agreement with Chinese battery maker LishenTesla Inc denied on Tuesday that it had signed a preliminary agreement with Tianjin Lishen to supply batteries for its new Shanghai car factory, saying it had received quotes from the Chinese battery maker but did not proceed further. "We have not signed any agreement of any kind with them," a Tesla spokeswoman told Reuters. Reuters earlier on Tuesday reported, citing two sources with direct knowledge of the matter, that Tesla and Lishen had signed a preliminary agreement and were working on the details.


     

  • To Sell Europe on Cyber Security, IBM Turns to Big Rig Operations Center      Tue, 22 Jan 2019 01:00:23 -0500

    To Sell Europe on Cyber Security, IBM Turns to Big Rig Operations CenterAs a journalist, I’ve covered cyberattacks and data breaches before, but it’s my first time being on the other end of that phone call. If teams wants to conduct additional training beyond that, then IBM charges, he said.


    To Sell Europe on Cyber Security, IBM Turns to Big Rig Operations CenterAs a journalist, I’ve covered cyberattacks and data breaches before, but it’s my first time being on the other end of that phone call. If teams wants to conduct additional training beyond that, then IBM charges, he said.


     

  • America's F-35 Stealth Fighter: The Ultimate Missile Killer?      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 23:00:00 -0500

    America's F-35 Stealth Fighter: The Ultimate Missile Killer?The Pentagon wants to add F-35 stealth fighters to America's missile shield. But to have any chance at shooting down ballistic missiles, the F-35 might need a new weapon.


    America's F-35 Stealth Fighter: The Ultimate Missile Killer?The Pentagon wants to add F-35 stealth fighters to America's missile shield. But to have any chance at shooting down ballistic missiles, the F-35 might need a new weapon.


     

  • Google Considering Pulling News Service From Europe      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 23:00:00 -0500

    Google Considering Pulling News Service From EuropeThe European Union’s Copyright Directive will give publishers the right to demand money from the Alphabet Inc. unit, Facebook Inc. and other web platforms when fragments of their articles show up in news search results, or are shared by users. Google News might be withdrawn from the continent in response to the new law, according to Jennifer Bernal, Google’s public policy manager for Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Google has various options, and the decision to pull out would be based on a close reading of the rules and taken reluctantly, she said.


    Google Considering Pulling News Service From EuropeThe European Union’s Copyright Directive will give publishers the right to demand money from the Alphabet Inc. unit, Facebook Inc. and other web platforms when fragments of their articles show up in news search results, or are shared by users. Google News might be withdrawn from the continent in response to the new law, according to Jennifer Bernal, Google’s public policy manager for Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Google has various options, and the decision to pull out would be based on a close reading of the rules and taken reluctantly, she said.


     

  • Hong Kong failing to tackle wildlife smuggling epidemic: study      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 22:38:20 -0500

    Hong Kong failing to tackle wildlife smuggling epidemic: studyHong Kong must do more to crack down on illegal wildlife smuggling by ending legal loopholes and lenient sentences, conservation groups said Monday, as they detailed the city's role in the lucrative trade. Despite its comparatively small size, the bustling southern Chinese transport hub plays a "disproportionate" role in wildlife crime, researchers said, accounting for around a fifth of all global ivory seizures and nearly half of all pangolins seized in the last decade. "Wildlife crime in Hong Kong remains under-policed and under-investigated," said Amanda Whitfort, a professor at Hong Kong University's Faculty of Law and one of the report's authors.


    Hong Kong failing to tackle wildlife smuggling epidemic: studyHong Kong must do more to crack down on illegal wildlife smuggling by ending legal loopholes and lenient sentences, conservation groups said Monday, as they detailed the city's role in the lucrative trade. Despite its comparatively small size, the bustling southern Chinese transport hub plays a "disproportionate" role in wildlife crime, researchers said, accounting for around a fifth of all global ivory seizures and nearly half of all pangolins seized in the last decade. "Wildlife crime in Hong Kong remains under-policed and under-investigated," said Amanda Whitfort, a professor at Hong Kong University's Faculty of Law and one of the report's authors.


     

  • North Korean base serves as missile headquarters: think tank      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 22:11:03 -0500

    North Korean base serves as missile headquarters: think tank"The Sino-ri missile operating base and the Nodong missiles deployed at this location fit into North Korea's presumed nuclear military strategy by providing an operational-level nuclear or conventional first strike capability," said the report co-authored by analyst Victor Cha. The discovery of an undeclared missile headquarters comes three days after U.S. President Donald Trump said he "looks forward" to another summit to discuss denuclearization with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in late February. Kim vowed to work toward denuclearization at his first summit with Trump in June, but there has since been little concrete progress.


    North Korean base serves as missile headquarters: think tank"The Sino-ri missile operating base and the Nodong missiles deployed at this location fit into North Korea's presumed nuclear military strategy by providing an operational-level nuclear or conventional first strike capability," said the report co-authored by analyst Victor Cha. The discovery of an undeclared missile headquarters comes three days after U.S. President Donald Trump said he "looks forward" to another summit to discuss denuclearization with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in late February. Kim vowed to work toward denuclearization at his first summit with Trump in June, but there has since been little concrete progress.


     

  • China Retail, Real Estate Slow More Sharply Than Overall Economy      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 21:47:36 -0500

    China Retail, Real Estate Slow More Sharply Than Overall EconomyTogether, they make up almost a third of the services sector. The services sector, which accounted for more than half of national output last year, suffered from deteriorating consumer confidence amid a crackdown on borrowing and the trade war with the U.S. The output of technology services increased 29.1 percent in the fourth quarter from a year earlier, versus 32.8 percent in the previous three-month through September, according to the National Statistics Bureau on Tuesday.


    China Retail, Real Estate Slow More Sharply Than Overall EconomyTogether, they make up almost a third of the services sector. The services sector, which accounted for more than half of national output last year, suffered from deteriorating consumer confidence amid a crackdown on borrowing and the trade war with the U.S. The output of technology services increased 29.1 percent in the fourth quarter from a year earlier, versus 32.8 percent in the previous three-month through September, according to the National Statistics Bureau on Tuesday.


     

  • China seems to confirm scientist's gene-edited babies claim      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 21:44:02 -0500

    China seems to confirm scientist's gene-edited babies claimChinese authorities appear to have confirmed a scientist's unpublished claim that he helped make the world's first gene-edited babies and that a second pregnancy is underway, and say he could face consequences for his work.


    China seems to confirm scientist's gene-edited babies claimChinese authorities appear to have confirmed a scientist's unpublished claim that he helped make the world's first gene-edited babies and that a second pregnancy is underway, and say he could face consequences for his work.


     

  • World to miss 2020 climate 'turning point': analysis      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 20:40:03 -0500

    World to miss 2020 climate 'turning point': analysisThe world is on course to miss its "best chance" of preventing runaway climate change by ensuring global greenhouse gas emissions peak in 2020, researchers warned Tuesday. In 2017, experts identified six key milestones that mankind must hit by 2020 if the Paris climate goal of limiting global temperature rises to 1.5 Celsius (2.7 Fahrenheit) is to have a fighting chance of being met. Chief among these are an immediate phasing out of fossil fuels, including a total halt to new coal power plant construction within two years, as well as an end to dirty energy subsidies.


    World to miss 2020 climate 'turning point': analysisThe world is on course to miss its "best chance" of preventing runaway climate change by ensuring global greenhouse gas emissions peak in 2020, researchers warned Tuesday. In 2017, experts identified six key milestones that mankind must hit by 2020 if the Paris climate goal of limiting global temperature rises to 1.5 Celsius (2.7 Fahrenheit) is to have a fighting chance of being met. Chief among these are an immediate phasing out of fossil fuels, including a total halt to new coal power plant construction within two years, as well as an end to dirty energy subsidies.


     

  • Death toll from Mexico pipeline blast reaches 91, Pemex defends response      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 20:19:46 -0500

    Death toll from Mexico pipeline blast reaches 91, Pemex defends responseHundreds of people near the small town of Tlahuelilpan in Hidalgo state rushed to collect fuel from a gushing duct which authorities said was punctured by suspected thieves, and dozens were caught in the explosion that followed. The blast followed severe shortages of gasoline in central Mexico after President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador in late December launched a major crackdown on fuel theft, ordering pipelines closed in a bid to thwart the criminal activity. Some people at the blast site said those shortages had encouraged local residents to try to make up the deficit by collecting fuel from the ruptured pipeline - a version of events that was backed up by officials in the state government.


    Death toll from Mexico pipeline blast reaches 91, Pemex defends responseHundreds of people near the small town of Tlahuelilpan in Hidalgo state rushed to collect fuel from a gushing duct which authorities said was punctured by suspected thieves, and dozens were caught in the explosion that followed. The blast followed severe shortages of gasoline in central Mexico after President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador in late December launched a major crackdown on fuel theft, ordering pipelines closed in a bid to thwart the criminal activity. Some people at the blast site said those shortages had encouraged local residents to try to make up the deficit by collecting fuel from the ruptured pipeline - a version of events that was backed up by officials in the state government.


     

  • Scientists make gene-edited chickens in bid to halt next pandemic      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 19:06:35 -0500

    Scientists make gene-edited chickens in bid to halt next pandemicThe first of the transgenic chicks will be hatched later this year at the Roslin Institute at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, said Wendy Barclay, a professor of virology at Imperial College London who is co-leading the project. The birds' DNA has been altered using a new gene editing technology known as CRISPR. In this case the "edits" are to remove parts of a protein on which the flu virus normally depends, making the chickens totally flu-resistant.


    Scientists make gene-edited chickens in bid to halt next pandemicThe first of the transgenic chicks will be hatched later this year at the Roslin Institute at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, said Wendy Barclay, a professor of virology at Imperial College London who is co-leading the project. The birds' DNA has been altered using a new gene editing technology known as CRISPR. In this case the "edits" are to remove parts of a protein on which the flu virus normally depends, making the chickens totally flu-resistant.


     

  • Bezos vs Ambani: The Billionaire Bout That Had to Happen      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 19:00:24 -0500

    Bezos vs Ambani: The Billionaire Bout That Had to HappenWalmart Inc.’s splashy acquisition last year of Flipkart Online Services Pvt., the homegrown e-tailer giving Amazon.com Inc. a solid run for its money, might have given the impression of a two-horse race. Third, Indians are watching almost 5 billion hours of video a month on their mobile phones and fiber broadband connections with Jio.


    Bezos vs Ambani: The Billionaire Bout That Had to HappenWalmart Inc.’s splashy acquisition last year of Flipkart Online Services Pvt., the homegrown e-tailer giving Amazon.com Inc. a solid run for its money, might have given the impression of a two-horse race. Third, Indians are watching almost 5 billion hours of video a month on their mobile phones and fiber broadband connections with Jio.


     

  • Blue Origin reschedules New Shepard spaceship’s test flight, citing high winds      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 18:14:16 -0500

    Blue Origin reschedules New Shepard spaceship’s test flight, citing high windsUpdate for 3:14 p.m. PT Jan. 21: Blue Origin, the space venture founded by Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos, says it's scheduling the next uncrewed test flight of its New Shepard suborbital space ship for Wednesday. Liftoff has been postponed several times, due to technical concerns as well as worries about high winds at the West Texas launch site. This week alone brought two schedule updates, first on Sunday: We have decided to push our #NewShepard launch attempt tomorrow. High winds expected in the area and one vehicle open issue. Updated launch target to come tomorrow – follow here for updates… Read More


    Blue Origin reschedules New Shepard spaceship’s test flight, citing high windsUpdate for 3:14 p.m. PT Jan. 21: Blue Origin, the space venture founded by Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos, says it's scheduling the next uncrewed test flight of its New Shepard suborbital space ship for Wednesday. Liftoff has been postponed several times, due to technical concerns as well as worries about high winds at the West Texas launch site. This week alone brought two schedule updates, first on Sunday: We have decided to push our #NewShepard launch attempt tomorrow. High winds expected in the area and one vehicle open issue. Updated launch target to come tomorrow – follow here for updates… Read More


     

  • Digital Securities Platform Joins IBM Blockchain Accelerator Program      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 18:12:00 -0500

    Digital Securities Platform Joins IBM Blockchain Accelerator ProgramCompliance platform for digital securities Securitize has joined the IBM Blockchain Accelerator program, Forbes reports on Jan. 21. According to Forbes, Securitize CEO Carlos Domingo said that the firm’s goal is to build a debt issuance platform using blockchain technology. The accelerator will purportedly last three months and will conclude with a presentation and demonstration of Securitize’s platform.


    Digital Securities Platform Joins IBM Blockchain Accelerator ProgramCompliance platform for digital securities Securitize has joined the IBM Blockchain Accelerator program, Forbes reports on Jan. 21. According to Forbes, Securitize CEO Carlos Domingo said that the firm’s goal is to build a debt issuance platform using blockchain technology. The accelerator will purportedly last three months and will conclude with a presentation and demonstration of Securitize’s platform.


     

  • 'Dog the Bounty Hunter' Star Beth Chapman Undergoing Chemotherapy for Throat Cancer      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 16:25:24 -0500

    'Dog the Bounty Hunter' Star Beth Chapman Undergoing Chemotherapy for Throat CancerA source tells ET her treatments for throat cancer began a month ago in Los Angeles.


    'Dog the Bounty Hunter' Star Beth Chapman Undergoing Chemotherapy for Throat CancerA source tells ET her treatments for throat cancer began a month ago in Los Angeles.


     

  • A New Blood Test Could Detect Alzheimer's 10 Years Earlier      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 16:20:09 -0500

    A New Blood Test Could Detect Alzheimer's 10 Years EarlierA New Blood Test Could Detect Alzheimer's 10 Years Earlier


    A New Blood Test Could Detect Alzheimer's 10 Years EarlierA New Blood Test Could Detect Alzheimer's 10 Years Earlier


     

  • BlackRock's Data Leak Strikes 20,000 Advisers      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 15:47:14 -0500

    BlackRock's Data Leak Strikes 20,000 AdvisersLPL informed advisers over the weekend that BlackRock posted details about some of them on its website. “After being informed by BlackRock of this issue, our first priority was to reach out to our advisers to make them aware of the situation and share the details we had learned,” Jeffrey Mochal, a spokesman for LPL, said Sunday in a statement. BlackRock and LPL are the latest financial firms to be ensnared in a data issue affecting a key part of their business.


    BlackRock's Data Leak Strikes 20,000 AdvisersLPL informed advisers over the weekend that BlackRock posted details about some of them on its website. “After being informed by BlackRock of this issue, our first priority was to reach out to our advisers to make them aware of the situation and share the details we had learned,” Jeffrey Mochal, a spokesman for LPL, said Sunday in a statement. BlackRock and LPL are the latest financial firms to be ensnared in a data issue affecting a key part of their business.


     

  • Oil edges up as investors latch on to OPEC cuts, supply outlook      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 15:46:15 -0500

    Oil edges up as investors latch on to OPEC cuts, supply outlookOil prices edged up on Monday, reversing earlier losses, as investors shrugged off data that confirmed China's economic growth is cooling and instead latched on to positive supply-side drivers for the market. Brent crude oil futures were up 12 cents at $62.83 a barrel by 3:23 p.m. EST (1727 GMT) versus Friday's settlement price, while U.S. crude futures were up 19 cents to $53.99 a barrel. Global equities fell after data pointed to a slowdown in Chinese economic growth in 2018 to a 28-year low.


    Oil edges up as investors latch on to OPEC cuts, supply outlookOil prices edged up on Monday, reversing earlier losses, as investors shrugged off data that confirmed China's economic growth is cooling and instead latched on to positive supply-side drivers for the market. Brent crude oil futures were up 12 cents at $62.83 a barrel by 3:23 p.m. EST (1727 GMT) versus Friday's settlement price, while U.S. crude futures were up 19 cents to $53.99 a barrel. Global equities fell after data pointed to a slowdown in Chinese economic growth in 2018 to a 28-year low.


     

  • Report reveals an undeclared North Korean missile base headquarters      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 15:31:51 -0500

    Report reveals an undeclared North Korean missile base headquarters"The Sino-ri missile operating base and the Nodong missiles deployed at this location fit into North Korea's presumed nuclear military strategy by providing an operational-level nuclear or conventional first strike capability," the report said. The discovery of an undeclared missile headquarters comes three days after U.S. President Donald Trump announced on Friday that he "looks forward" to another summit to discuss denuclearization with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in late February.


    Report reveals an undeclared North Korean missile base headquarters"The Sino-ri missile operating base and the Nodong missiles deployed at this location fit into North Korea's presumed nuclear military strategy by providing an operational-level nuclear or conventional first strike capability," the report said. The discovery of an undeclared missile headquarters comes three days after U.S. President Donald Trump announced on Friday that he "looks forward" to another summit to discuss denuclearization with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in late February.


     

  • Stunning photos show the super blood moon in all its glory      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 14:38:57 -0500

    Stunning photos show the super blood moon in all its gloryIn the wise words of Yello, "Oooh yeah. The moon is beautiful."  Western hemisphere skywatchers enjoyed front row seats to a stunning celestial treat Sunday night as the only total lunar eclipse of 2019 arrived in its full glory. An eclipse of similar caliber is not due again until 2022.  "Visible for its entirety in North and South America, this eclipse is being referred to by some as a super blood moon," explains Lyle Tavernier, educational technology specialist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "'Super' because the moon will be closest to Earth in its orbit during the full moon ... and 'blood' because the total lunar eclipse will turn the Moon a reddish hue." SEE ALSO: Blame a wobbly polar vortex for why you're so damn cold The awe-inspiring event took over the sky for a total of 62 minutes, giving photographers plenty of time to snag incredible shots. So if you missed out on this one-of-a-kind stunner or are looking to relive the magic, check out their gorgeous work below. Image: Ringo H W Chiu/AP/REX/Shutterstock Image: J David Ake/AP/REX/Shutterstock Image: JIM LO SCALZO/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock Image: CATI CLADERA/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock Image: JIM LO SCALZO/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock Image: Virginia Mayo/AP/REX/Shutterstock Image: VALENTIN FLAURAUD/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock Image: Rich Pedroncelli/AP/REX/Shutterstock ## WATCH: Virgin Galactic reaches the edge of space


    Stunning photos show the super blood moon in all its gloryIn the wise words of Yello, "Oooh yeah. The moon is beautiful."  Western hemisphere skywatchers enjoyed front row seats to a stunning celestial treat Sunday night as the only total lunar eclipse of 2019 arrived in its full glory. An eclipse of similar caliber is not due again until 2022.  "Visible for its entirety in North and South America, this eclipse is being referred to by some as a super blood moon," explains Lyle Tavernier, educational technology specialist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "'Super' because the moon will be closest to Earth in its orbit during the full moon ... and 'blood' because the total lunar eclipse will turn the Moon a reddish hue." SEE ALSO: Blame a wobbly polar vortex for why you're so damn cold The awe-inspiring event took over the sky for a total of 62 minutes, giving photographers plenty of time to snag incredible shots. So if you missed out on this one-of-a-kind stunner or are looking to relive the magic, check out their gorgeous work below. Image: Ringo H W Chiu/AP/REX/Shutterstock Image: J David Ake/AP/REX/Shutterstock Image: JIM LO SCALZO/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock Image: CATI CLADERA/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock Image: JIM LO SCALZO/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock Image: Virginia Mayo/AP/REX/Shutterstock Image: VALENTIN FLAURAUD/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock Image: Rich Pedroncelli/AP/REX/Shutterstock ## WATCH: Virgin Galactic reaches the edge of space


     

  • AbbVie's Imbruvica Fails in Phase III Pancreatic Cancer Study      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 14:08:07 -0500

    AbbVie's Imbruvica Fails in Phase III Pancreatic Cancer StudyAbbVie's (ABBV) Imbruvica falls short of meeting the primary endpoint of PFS or OS benefit in a phase III study that probed its combo usage in first-line metastatic pancreatic cancer.


    AbbVie's Imbruvica Fails in Phase III Pancreatic Cancer StudyAbbVie's (ABBV) Imbruvica falls short of meeting the primary endpoint of PFS or OS benefit in a phase III study that probed its combo usage in first-line metastatic pancreatic cancer.


     

  • European Space Agency wants to start drilling on the Moon in an effort to find oxygen and water      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 13:56:25 -0500

    European Space Agency wants to start drilling on the Moon in an effort to find oxygen and waterThe European Space Agency  (ESA) is hoping to start mining on the Moon by 2025. The ESA has signed a 12-month contract with the rocket maker ArianeGroup to study and prepare for the mission which aims to extract regolith, or Moon rock. Regolith covers the entire lunar surface to a depth of at least 12 feet, as it made up of a mix of clays, glass fragments, minerals and chemical compounds like iron oxide from which oxygen, water and fuel could be extracted. Many space agencies now believe space mining is crucial for the establishment of permanent lunar bases or colonies. Dr David Parker, Director, Human and Robotic Exploration at ESA, said: “The use of space resources could be a key to sustainable lunar exploration and this study is part of ESA's comprehensive plan to make Europe a partner in global exploration in the next decade - a plan we will put to our Ministers for decision later this year at the Space19+ Conference.” ArianeGroup with Arianespace is joining forces with a German start-up, PTScientists, which will design and build the lunar lander, and a Belgian company, Space Applications Services, which will provide the ground control facilities, the communications and the associated service operations. The company said the mission would not involve sending humans to the Moon, but robotic equipment. André-Hubert Roussel, CEO of ArianeGroup, said: “This first contract – symbolically announced on the day of a lunar eclipse – is a milestone for ArianeGroup, which has for a long time been working on technological proposals for space logistics servicing.” “It is also an opportunity to recall the ability of Ariane 64 to carry out Moon missions for its institutional customers, with a payload capacity of up to 8.5 metric tons. “In this year, marking the fiftieth anniversary of Man’s first steps on the Moon, ArianeGroup will thus support all current and future European projects, in line with its mission to guarantee independent, sovereign access to space for Europe.”


    European Space Agency wants to start drilling on the Moon in an effort to find oxygen and waterThe European Space Agency  (ESA) is hoping to start mining on the Moon by 2025. The ESA has signed a 12-month contract with the rocket maker ArianeGroup to study and prepare for the mission which aims to extract regolith, or Moon rock. Regolith covers the entire lunar surface to a depth of at least 12 feet, as it made up of a mix of clays, glass fragments, minerals and chemical compounds like iron oxide from which oxygen, water and fuel could be extracted. Many space agencies now believe space mining is crucial for the establishment of permanent lunar bases or colonies. Dr David Parker, Director, Human and Robotic Exploration at ESA, said: “The use of space resources could be a key to sustainable lunar exploration and this study is part of ESA's comprehensive plan to make Europe a partner in global exploration in the next decade - a plan we will put to our Ministers for decision later this year at the Space19+ Conference.” ArianeGroup with Arianespace is joining forces with a German start-up, PTScientists, which will design and build the lunar lander, and a Belgian company, Space Applications Services, which will provide the ground control facilities, the communications and the associated service operations. The company said the mission would not involve sending humans to the Moon, but robotic equipment. André-Hubert Roussel, CEO of ArianeGroup, said: “This first contract – symbolically announced on the day of a lunar eclipse – is a milestone for ArianeGroup, which has for a long time been working on technological proposals for space logistics servicing.” “It is also an opportunity to recall the ability of Ariane 64 to carry out Moon missions for its institutional customers, with a payload capacity of up to 8.5 metric tons. “In this year, marking the fiftieth anniversary of Man’s first steps on the Moon, ArianeGroup will thus support all current and future European projects, in line with its mission to guarantee independent, sovereign access to space for Europe.”


     

  • Mexico pipeline explosion killed 89, Pemex defends response      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 13:33:31 -0500

    Mexico pipeline explosion killed 89, Pemex defends responseThere were also 51 people injured, Health Minister Jorge Alcocer told a morning news conference. Over the weekend, a series of possible missteps by the current government became clear, from the delay in shutting off the pipeline, to relatives saying fuel shortages caused by the government's anti-theft policy attracted people to the leak.


    Mexico pipeline explosion killed 89, Pemex defends responseThere were also 51 people injured, Health Minister Jorge Alcocer told a morning news conference. Over the weekend, a series of possible missteps by the current government became clear, from the delay in shutting off the pipeline, to relatives saying fuel shortages caused by the government's anti-theft policy attracted people to the leak.


     

  • Canadian railways ration space as commodity congestion problems worsen      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 13:22:02 -0500

    Canadian railways ration space as commodity congestion problems worsenCanada's two major railways are rationing space on trains traveling to the country's biggest port and recently prioritized some commodities over others to deal with congestion, the latest indication of their struggle to meet demand from new trade deals. Canada is a top shipper of crops, fertilizer, oil and pulp, but has in recent years needed government intervention to keep commodities moving, from ordering railways to clear grain backlogs to Alberta's crude oil curtailments this month due to full pipelines.


    Canadian railways ration space as commodity congestion problems worsenCanada's two major railways are rationing space on trains traveling to the country's biggest port and recently prioritized some commodities over others to deal with congestion, the latest indication of their struggle to meet demand from new trade deals. Canada is a top shipper of crops, fertilizer, oil and pulp, but has in recent years needed government intervention to keep commodities moving, from ordering railways to clear grain backlogs to Alberta's crude oil curtailments this month due to full pipelines.


     

  • MIT Professor: Blockchain Can Allow for More Inclusive, Borderless Economy      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 13:17:00 -0500

    MIT Professor: Blockchain Can Allow for More Inclusive, Borderless EconomyBlockchain can allow for the creation of a borderless economy, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) professor Silvio Micali claimed in a interview on Bloomberg’s Daybreak Asia, Jan. 21. Speaking on the show, Micali outlined three major properties of blockchain systems that must function simultaneously to enable a more inclusive and borderless economy — security, decentralization and scalability. According to MIT’s Ford Professor of Engineering, until recently, only two of those three basic properties could have been achieved simultaneously at any time.


    MIT Professor: Blockchain Can Allow for More Inclusive, Borderless EconomyBlockchain can allow for the creation of a borderless economy, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) professor Silvio Micali claimed in a interview on Bloomberg’s Daybreak Asia, Jan. 21. Speaking on the show, Micali outlined three major properties of blockchain systems that must function simultaneously to enable a more inclusive and borderless economy — security, decentralization and scalability. According to MIT’s Ford Professor of Engineering, until recently, only two of those three basic properties could have been achieved simultaneously at any time.


     

  • Photographers get super views of ‘Super Blood Wolf Moon’ eclipse — even in Seattle      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 13:15:46 -0500

    Photographers get super views of ‘Super Blood Wolf Moon’ eclipse — even in SeattleJanuary’s usual weather conditions — with chilly temperatures for much of America and cloudy skies in the Pacific Northwest — aren’t exactly ideal for tracking a total lunar eclipse, but Sunday night’s “Super Blood Wolf Moon” actually lived up to the hype. Photographers across much of the country braved the cold to get some jaw-dropping snapshots and time-lapse views. Even in Seattle, where the weather forecast wasn’t promising, the hours-long progression from supersized full moon to a ruddy darkness and back to lunar brightness unfolded in mostly clear skies. Let’s start with my top-10 favorites from Twitter, then get down to… Read More


    Photographers get super views of ‘Super Blood Wolf Moon’ eclipse — even in SeattleJanuary’s usual weather conditions — with chilly temperatures for much of America and cloudy skies in the Pacific Northwest — aren’t exactly ideal for tracking a total lunar eclipse, but Sunday night’s “Super Blood Wolf Moon” actually lived up to the hype. Photographers across much of the country braved the cold to get some jaw-dropping snapshots and time-lapse views. Even in Seattle, where the weather forecast wasn’t promising, the hours-long progression from supersized full moon to a ruddy darkness and back to lunar brightness unfolded in mostly clear skies. Let’s start with my top-10 favorites from Twitter, then get down to… Read More


     

  • See The Most Dazzling Photos Of January's Super Blood Wolf Moon      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 13:10:39 -0500

    See The Most Dazzling Photos Of January's Super Blood Wolf MoonA total lunar eclipse dominated the sky on Sunday night, to the delight of


    See The Most Dazzling Photos Of January's Super Blood Wolf MoonA total lunar eclipse dominated the sky on Sunday night, to the delight of


     

  • Trade worries sour CEOs' mood as leaders converge on Davos      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 12:54:03 -0500

    Trade worries sour CEOs' mood as leaders converge on DavosChief executives across the world have grown a lot more pessimistic about the global economic outlook due to trade disputes and tense relations between major powers, a survey showed on the eve of the World Economic Forum in Davos. The PwC survey of nearly 1,400 CEOs found that 29 percent believe global economic growth will decline over the next 12 months, six times the level of last year and the highest percentage since 2012. The most pronounced shift was among business leaders in the United States, where optimism dropped to 37 percent from 63 percent a year ago against the backdrop of an economic slowdown and a trade war with China.


    Trade worries sour CEOs' mood as leaders converge on DavosChief executives across the world have grown a lot more pessimistic about the global economic outlook due to trade disputes and tense relations between major powers, a survey showed on the eve of the World Economic Forum in Davos. The PwC survey of nearly 1,400 CEOs found that 29 percent believe global economic growth will decline over the next 12 months, six times the level of last year and the highest percentage since 2012. The most pronounced shift was among business leaders in the United States, where optimism dropped to 37 percent from 63 percent a year ago against the backdrop of an economic slowdown and a trade war with China.


     

  • Nigeria's ruling party accuses opposition of plotting pre-vote violence      Mon, 21 Jan 2019 12:09:47 -0500

    Nigeria's ruling party accuses opposition of plotting pre-vote violenceThe Feb. 16 vote in Africa's top oil producer pits Buhari, a military ruler in the 1980s who was voted into office in 2015, against main opposition candidate Atiku Abubakar, a businessman and former vice president. Reliable polls are hard to find in the nation of 190 million people, and analysts widely expect a tight race, partly because opposition stronghold states have seen a bigger increase in voter registration than ones where the ruling party is popular. "We have credible intelligence that armed bandits andBoko Haram insurgents have been mobilized to engage in massive attacks and other acts of violence in several states," Information Minister Lai Mohammed said, pointing the finger at Abubakar's People's Democratic Party (PDP).


    Nigeria's ruling party accuses opposition of plotting pre-vote violenceThe Feb. 16 vote in Africa's top oil producer pits Buhari, a military ruler in the 1980s who was voted into office in 2015, against main opposition candidate Atiku Abubakar, a businessman and former vice president. Reliable polls are hard to find in the nation of 190 million people, and analysts widely expect a tight race, partly because opposition stronghold states have seen a bigger increase in voter registration than ones where the ruling party is popular. "We have credible intelligence that armed bandits andBoko Haram insurgents have been mobilized to engage in massive attacks and other acts of violence in several states," Information Minister Lai Mohammed said, pointing the finger at Abubakar's People's Democratic Party (PDP).


     



Copyright 1997-2011 SQLData System, Inc  All rights reserved.

Comments, or suggestions? Send to info2 at sqldata.com

This site is powered by SQLData SOAP Server