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ChannelYahoo News - Latest News & Headlines    
RSS File: https://news.yahoo.com/rss/topstories
Description: The latest news and headlines from Yahoo! News. Get breaking news stories and in-depth coverage with videos and photos.
  • One of Trump's favorite pollsters shows his approval plummeting      Wed, 27 May 2020 14:39:59 -0400

    One of Trump's favorite pollsters shows his approval plummetingPresident Trump’s approval rating has plummeted since late February, according to the Rasmussen daily tracking poll, which the president frequently cited during his first three years in office.


    One of Trump's favorite pollsters shows his approval plummetingPresident Trump’s approval rating has plummeted since late February, according to the Rasmussen daily tracking poll, which the president frequently cited during his first three years in office.


     

  • US braced for more protests over police killing of black man      Thu, 28 May 2020 15:45:37 -0400

    US braced for more protests over police killing of black manMinneapolis officials called for calm Thursday as they girded for fresh violence after a second night of demonstrations over the police killing of an unarmed African American left numerous stores ablaze and one person dead. Protesters were planning to take to the streets again in the northern US city Thursday evening over the death in custody of 46-year-old restaurant worker George Floyd, seen as the latest in a long series of unjustified police killings of black civilians. The White House said President Donald Trump was "very upset" upon seeing "egregious, appalling" video footage of Monday's killing and had demanded his staff see that the investigation was given top priority.


    US braced for more protests over police killing of black manMinneapolis officials called for calm Thursday as they girded for fresh violence after a second night of demonstrations over the police killing of an unarmed African American left numerous stores ablaze and one person dead. Protesters were planning to take to the streets again in the northern US city Thursday evening over the death in custody of 46-year-old restaurant worker George Floyd, seen as the latest in a long series of unjustified police killings of black civilians. The White House said President Donald Trump was "very upset" upon seeing "egregious, appalling" video footage of Monday's killing and had demanded his staff see that the investigation was given top priority.


     

  • Pakistani villager urges India to return 'spy' pigeon      Wed, 27 May 2020 09:29:30 -0400

    Pakistani villager urges India to return 'spy' pigeonThe owner of a pigeon "arrested" by India for spying says his bird was freed for Eid and is innocent.


    Pakistani villager urges India to return 'spy' pigeonThe owner of a pigeon "arrested" by India for spying says his bird was freed for Eid and is innocent.


     

  • So-called honor killing of teen girl sparks outcry in Iran      Wed, 27 May 2020 17:53:36 -0400

    So-called honor killing of teen girl sparks outcry in IranThe so-called honor killing of a 14-year-old Iranian girl by her dad, who reportedly beheaded her as she slept, has sparked a nationwide outcry.


    So-called honor killing of teen girl sparks outcry in IranThe so-called honor killing of a 14-year-old Iranian girl by her dad, who reportedly beheaded her as she slept, has sparked a nationwide outcry.


     

  • Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina Ashrafi      Thu, 28 May 2020 06:36:20 -0400

    Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina AshrafiThe killing of an Iranian teen by her father after she eloped with an older man sparked outrage on Wednesday, with local media denouncing "institutionalised violence" in "patriarchal" Iran. Iranian media covered the apparent "honour" crime extensively, with Ebtekar newspaper leading its front page with the headline "Unsafe father's house". According to local media, Romina Ashrafi was killed in her sleep on May 21 by her father, who decapitated her in the family home in Talesh in northern Gilan province. The reports said her father had refused her permission to marry a man fifteen years her senior, spurring her to run away, but she was returned home after her father reported her. The legal marriage age in Iran is 13 for women. Iranian media reported that after authorities detained the teenager, she told a judge she feared for her life if she was returned to home. But what most outraged public opinion was the lenient punishment the father is likely to face, Ebtekar wrote. The newspaper notes that Iran's normal "eye for an eye" retributive justice does not apply to fathers who kill their children. Accordingly, he is likely to face three to 10 years in prison, a sentence that could be reduced further, the newspaper wrote, denouncing the "institutionalised violence" of Iran's "patriarchal culture". With the farsi hashtag Romina_Ashrafi focusing outrage on Twitter, President Hassan Rouhani "expressed his regrets" in a cabinet meeting on Wednesday, pleading for the speedy passing of several anti-violence bills, his office said. On Twitter, Vice President for Women and Family Affairs, Masoumeh Ebtekar, said a bill on the protection of young people was in the "final phase" of validation by Iran's Guardian Council. The council, which vets legislation to ensure compliance with Iran's constitution and Islamic sharia law, has thrice previously called for changes to the law after it was passed by lawmakers, Ebtekar newspaper wrote. The publication fears that if the council sends back the bill, it will be buried by Iran's new parliament, which held its first session Wednesday and is dominated by conservatives and hardliners opposed to Rouhani.


    Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina AshrafiThe killing of an Iranian teen by her father after she eloped with an older man sparked outrage on Wednesday, with local media denouncing "institutionalised violence" in "patriarchal" Iran. Iranian media covered the apparent "honour" crime extensively, with Ebtekar newspaper leading its front page with the headline "Unsafe father's house". According to local media, Romina Ashrafi was killed in her sleep on May 21 by her father, who decapitated her in the family home in Talesh in northern Gilan province. The reports said her father had refused her permission to marry a man fifteen years her senior, spurring her to run away, but she was returned home after her father reported her. The legal marriage age in Iran is 13 for women. Iranian media reported that after authorities detained the teenager, she told a judge she feared for her life if she was returned to home. But what most outraged public opinion was the lenient punishment the father is likely to face, Ebtekar wrote. The newspaper notes that Iran's normal "eye for an eye" retributive justice does not apply to fathers who kill their children. Accordingly, he is likely to face three to 10 years in prison, a sentence that could be reduced further, the newspaper wrote, denouncing the "institutionalised violence" of Iran's "patriarchal culture". With the farsi hashtag Romina_Ashrafi focusing outrage on Twitter, President Hassan Rouhani "expressed his regrets" in a cabinet meeting on Wednesday, pleading for the speedy passing of several anti-violence bills, his office said. On Twitter, Vice President for Women and Family Affairs, Masoumeh Ebtekar, said a bill on the protection of young people was in the "final phase" of validation by Iran's Guardian Council. The council, which vets legislation to ensure compliance with Iran's constitution and Islamic sharia law, has thrice previously called for changes to the law after it was passed by lawmakers, Ebtekar newspaper wrote. The publication fears that if the council sends back the bill, it will be buried by Iran's new parliament, which held its first session Wednesday and is dominated by conservatives and hardliners opposed to Rouhani.


     

  • Sudan says three jailed members of ousted Bashir regime have coronavirus      Wed, 27 May 2020 14:27:41 -0400
     
  • The Chinese CDC now says the coronavirus didn't jump to people at the Wuhan wet market — instead, it was the site of a super-spreader event      Thu, 28 May 2020 18:49:00 -0400

    The Chinese CDC now says the coronavirus didn't jump to people at the Wuhan wet market — instead, it was the site of a super-spreader eventThe origin of the new coronavirus still isn't known. But according to the Chinese CDC, it isn't the wet market in Wuhan.


    The Chinese CDC now says the coronavirus didn't jump to people at the Wuhan wet market — instead, it was the site of a super-spreader eventThe origin of the new coronavirus still isn't known. But according to the Chinese CDC, it isn't the wet market in Wuhan.


     

  • Justice Department clears 3 senators in stock sales investigation, but Burr's case appears ongoing      Wed, 27 May 2020 10:46:04 -0400

    Justice Department clears 3 senators in stock sales investigation, but Burr's case appears ongoingInvestigations into Sens. Feinstein, Loeffler and Inhofe have been dropped. Sen. Richard Burr appears to still be under investigation.


    Justice Department clears 3 senators in stock sales investigation, but Burr's case appears ongoingInvestigations into Sens. Feinstein, Loeffler and Inhofe have been dropped. Sen. Richard Burr appears to still be under investigation.


     

  • Spread of coronavirus fuels corruption in Latin America      Wed, 27 May 2020 00:08:46 -0400

    Spread of coronavirus fuels corruption in Latin AmericaFrom Argentina to Panama, a number of officials have been forced to resign as reports of fraudulent purchases of ventilators, masks and other medical supplies pile up. “Whenever there’s a dire situation, spending rules are relaxed and there’s always someone around looking to take advantage to make a profit,” said José Ugaz, a former Peruvian prosecutor who jailed former President Alberto Fujimori and was chairman of Transparency International from 2014-17. Coronavirus clusters are still spreading in Latin America, fueling a spike in deaths, swamping already-precarious hospitals and threatening to ravage slumping economies.


    Spread of coronavirus fuels corruption in Latin AmericaFrom Argentina to Panama, a number of officials have been forced to resign as reports of fraudulent purchases of ventilators, masks and other medical supplies pile up. “Whenever there’s a dire situation, spending rules are relaxed and there’s always someone around looking to take advantage to make a profit,” said José Ugaz, a former Peruvian prosecutor who jailed former President Alberto Fujimori and was chairman of Transparency International from 2014-17. Coronavirus clusters are still spreading in Latin America, fueling a spike in deaths, swamping already-precarious hospitals and threatening to ravage slumping economies.


     

  • Levi’s Is Taking 50% off These Best-Selling Jeans Right Now      Wed, 27 May 2020 10:23:00 -0400
     
  • Ann Coulter doesn't know if she will vote for 'defective man' Donald Trump      Wed, 27 May 2020 17:29:02 -0400

    Ann Coulter doesn't know if she will vote for 'defective man' Donald TrumpConservative author and commentator Ann Coulter told Yahoo News she may cast a write-in vote for former U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions rather than vote to reelect Trump.


    Ann Coulter doesn't know if she will vote for 'defective man' Donald TrumpConservative author and commentator Ann Coulter told Yahoo News she may cast a write-in vote for former U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions rather than vote to reelect Trump.


     

  • Minneapolis mayor calls for calm after a 2nd night of protests over George Floyd's death collapses into chaos, leaving a Target looted and an AutoZone on fire      Thu, 28 May 2020 03:25:19 -0400

    Minneapolis mayor calls for calm after a 2nd night of protests over George Floyd's death collapses into chaos, leaving a Target looted and an AutoZone on fire"Please, Minneapolis, we cannot let tragedy beget more tragedy," Mayor Jacob Frey said after a night that left shops looted and on fire.


    Minneapolis mayor calls for calm after a 2nd night of protests over George Floyd's death collapses into chaos, leaving a Target looted and an AutoZone on fire"Please, Minneapolis, we cannot let tragedy beget more tragedy," Mayor Jacob Frey said after a night that left shops looted and on fire.


     

  • Amy Cooper: Woman sacked after calling police on black man      Thu, 28 May 2020 10:53:46 -0400

    Amy Cooper: Woman sacked after calling police on black manThe woman, identified as Amy Cooper, called police saying an African-American man was threatening her life.


    Amy Cooper: Woman sacked after calling police on black manThe woman, identified as Amy Cooper, called police saying an African-American man was threatening her life.


     

  • Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vessels      Thu, 28 May 2020 09:15:47 -0400

    Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vesselsIran's Revolutionary Guards on Thursday warned the United States against its naval presence in the Gulf as they received 110 new combat vessels. "We announce today that wherever the Americans are, we are right next to them, and they will feel our presence even more in the near future," the Guards' navy chief Rear Admiral Alireza Tangsiri said during a ceremony in southern Iran. Iran and the United States have appeared to be on the brink of an all-out confrontation twice in the past year.


    Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vesselsIran's Revolutionary Guards on Thursday warned the United States against its naval presence in the Gulf as they received 110 new combat vessels. "We announce today that wherever the Americans are, we are right next to them, and they will feel our presence even more in the near future," the Guards' navy chief Rear Admiral Alireza Tangsiri said during a ceremony in southern Iran. Iran and the United States have appeared to be on the brink of an all-out confrontation twice in the past year.


     

  • Huawei CFO Meng loses key court fight against extradition to United States      Wed, 27 May 2020 05:08:38 -0400

    Huawei CFO Meng loses key court fight against extradition to United StatesHuawei Technologies Co's Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou was dealt a setback by a Canadian court on Wednesday as she tries to avoid extradition to the United States to face bank fraud charges, dashing hopes for an end to her 18-month house arrest in Vancouver. The ruling, which could further deteriorate relations between Ottawa and Beijing, elicited immediate strong reaction from China's embassy in Canada, which said Canada is "accomplice to United States efforts to bring down Huawei and Chinese high-tech companies."


    Huawei CFO Meng loses key court fight against extradition to United StatesHuawei Technologies Co's Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou was dealt a setback by a Canadian court on Wednesday as she tries to avoid extradition to the United States to face bank fraud charges, dashing hopes for an end to her 18-month house arrest in Vancouver. The ruling, which could further deteriorate relations between Ottawa and Beijing, elicited immediate strong reaction from China's embassy in Canada, which said Canada is "accomplice to United States efforts to bring down Huawei and Chinese high-tech companies."


     

  • British mercenaries 'involved in botched operation' backing rebel leader in Libya, according to secret UN report      Wed, 27 May 2020 15:43:30 -0400

    British mercenaries 'involved in botched operation' backing rebel leader in Libya, according to secret UN reportSix British citizens including two former Royal Marine commandos have been accused of taking part in a botched mercenary mission to Libya to fight on behalf of renegade general Khalifa Haftar. The five men and one woman are named in a confidential report by the United Nations panel of experts on Libya into a botched mission that ended with the mercenaries making a remarkable sea-borne escape after falling out with their hosts. The men, including former Royal Marines Sean Callaghan Louw and Andrew Scott Ritchie, were among around 20 mercenaries who travelled to Benghazi in eastern Libya in June 2019 in a contract organised by a UAE based company called Opus, according to the report seen by the Daily Telegraph. Amanda Perry, a United Arab Emirate based businesswoman, is identified and is alleged to have been a "facilitator" of the project. She is the managing director of Opus Capital Asset FZE, the company that hired two boats used by the group. She is also company secretary of Lancaster 6, a business owned by Christiaan Durrant, a former Australian fighter pilot and Malta resident who is also named - and accused of being a facilitator in the report.


    British mercenaries 'involved in botched operation' backing rebel leader in Libya, according to secret UN reportSix British citizens including two former Royal Marine commandos have been accused of taking part in a botched mercenary mission to Libya to fight on behalf of renegade general Khalifa Haftar. The five men and one woman are named in a confidential report by the United Nations panel of experts on Libya into a botched mission that ended with the mercenaries making a remarkable sea-borne escape after falling out with their hosts. The men, including former Royal Marines Sean Callaghan Louw and Andrew Scott Ritchie, were among around 20 mercenaries who travelled to Benghazi in eastern Libya in June 2019 in a contract organised by a UAE based company called Opus, according to the report seen by the Daily Telegraph. Amanda Perry, a United Arab Emirate based businesswoman, is identified and is alleged to have been a "facilitator" of the project. She is the managing director of Opus Capital Asset FZE, the company that hired two boats used by the group. She is also company secretary of Lancaster 6, a business owned by Christiaan Durrant, a former Australian fighter pilot and Malta resident who is also named - and accused of being a facilitator in the report.


     

  • CDC changes its 'confusing' guidelines on coronavirus and surfaces. Here's what we know.      Wed, 27 May 2020 14:48:19 -0400

    CDC changes its 'confusing' guidelines on coronavirus and surfaces. Here's what we know.This new CDC update may quell some major concerns about how COVID-19 is transmitted, but plenty of questions still remain. Here's what to know.


    CDC changes its 'confusing' guidelines on coronavirus and surfaces. Here's what we know.This new CDC update may quell some major concerns about how COVID-19 is transmitted, but plenty of questions still remain. Here's what to know.


     

  • One chart shows a noticeable correlation between how late a country started its coronavirus lockdown and the number of excess deaths      Thu, 28 May 2020 09:30:06 -0400

    One chart shows a noticeable correlation between how late a country started its coronavirus lockdown and the number of excess deathsAnalysis from the Financial Times has shown that the number of excess deaths correlates to when a country decided to lock down.


    One chart shows a noticeable correlation between how late a country started its coronavirus lockdown and the number of excess deathsAnalysis from the Financial Times has shown that the number of excess deaths correlates to when a country decided to lock down.


     

  • Rights group urges inquiry into Philippine drug war killings      Wed, 27 May 2020 02:50:19 -0400

    Rights group urges inquiry into Philippine drug war killingsHuman Rights Watch is calling on the U.N.’s top human rights body to launch an independent investigation into the Philippine government’s drug war that has left thousands dead, pointing in particular to its harmful effects on children. The advocacy group made the call alongside Wednesday's launch of a report timed for the U.N.-backed Human Rights Council session next month. The 48-page report is based on nearly 50 interviews and examines the impact of about two dozen killings under President Rodrigo Duterte’s drug war.


    Rights group urges inquiry into Philippine drug war killingsHuman Rights Watch is calling on the U.N.’s top human rights body to launch an independent investigation into the Philippine government’s drug war that has left thousands dead, pointing in particular to its harmful effects on children. The advocacy group made the call alongside Wednesday's launch of a report timed for the U.N.-backed Human Rights Council session next month. The 48-page report is based on nearly 50 interviews and examines the impact of about two dozen killings under President Rodrigo Duterte’s drug war.


     

  • Coronavirus infections are rising as states reopen, potentially signaling a second wave      Wed, 27 May 2020 11:48:47 -0400

    Coronavirus infections are rising as states reopen, potentially signaling a second waveTwenty states reported an increase in new infections during the week ending May 24, up from 13 states the week before.


    Coronavirus infections are rising as states reopen, potentially signaling a second waveTwenty states reported an increase in new infections during the week ending May 24, up from 13 states the week before.


     

  • Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints      Thu, 28 May 2020 14:37:00 -0400

    Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaintsGeorge Floyd's death in police custody is renewing criticism of Sen. Amy Klobuchar's (D-Minn.) prosecutorial record.Before she became a senator and a top contender for former Vice President Joe Biden's vice presidential spot, Klobuchar spent eight years as the Hennepin County attorney, in charge of prosecution for Minneapolis. And while in that position, Klobuchar declined to prosecute multiple police officers cited for excessive force, including the officer who kneeled on Floyd's neck as he protested, The Guardian reports.Ex-Minneapolis police officer Derick Chauvin saw at least 10 conduct complaints during his 19-year tenure before he was fired Tuesday, according to a database that documents complaints against police. In particular, he was involved in the shooting death of a man who had stabbed other people before attacking police, as well as some other undisclosed complaints. Klobuchar did not prosecute Chauvin for the first death, and he was later placed on leave when he and other officers shot and wounded a Native American man in 2011.As The Washington Post noted in March, Klobuchar "declined to bring charges in more than two dozen cases in which people were killed in encounters with police" as Hennepin County attorney. Instead, she "aggressively prosecuted smaller offenses" that "have been criticized for their disproportionate effect on poor and minority communities," the Post continues. And as Klobuchar undergoes vetting to become a possible vice presidential candidate, that track record is being scrutinized and criticized once again.More stories from theweek.com Minneapolis official calls for naming 'disease' of racism a public health issue after George Floyd death Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat' Trump signs executive order seeking regulations on social media


    Amy Klobuchar didn't prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaintsGeorge Floyd's death in police custody is renewing criticism of Sen. Amy Klobuchar's (D-Minn.) prosecutorial record.Before she became a senator and a top contender for former Vice President Joe Biden's vice presidential spot, Klobuchar spent eight years as the Hennepin County attorney, in charge of prosecution for Minneapolis. And while in that position, Klobuchar declined to prosecute multiple police officers cited for excessive force, including the officer who kneeled on Floyd's neck as he protested, The Guardian reports.Ex-Minneapolis police officer Derick Chauvin saw at least 10 conduct complaints during his 19-year tenure before he was fired Tuesday, according to a database that documents complaints against police. In particular, he was involved in the shooting death of a man who had stabbed other people before attacking police, as well as some other undisclosed complaints. Klobuchar did not prosecute Chauvin for the first death, and he was later placed on leave when he and other officers shot and wounded a Native American man in 2011.As The Washington Post noted in March, Klobuchar "declined to bring charges in more than two dozen cases in which people were killed in encounters with police" as Hennepin County attorney. Instead, she "aggressively prosecuted smaller offenses" that "have been criticized for their disproportionate effect on poor and minority communities," the Post continues. And as Klobuchar undergoes vetting to become a possible vice presidential candidate, that track record is being scrutinized and criticized once again.More stories from theweek.com Minneapolis official calls for naming 'disease' of racism a public health issue after George Floyd death Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat' Trump signs executive order seeking regulations on social media


     

  • Police arrested a Bay Area woman who they say posted racist notes on the homes of Asian Americans      Wed, 27 May 2020 11:17:12 -0400

    Police arrested a Bay Area woman who they say posted racist notes on the homes of Asian AmericansThe notes suggested that those not native to the US leave the country immediately.


    Police arrested a Bay Area woman who they say posted racist notes on the homes of Asian AmericansThe notes suggested that those not native to the US leave the country immediately.


     

  • This Neo-Futuristic Home Found Its Inspiration in the British Countryside      Wed, 27 May 2020 16:14:43 -0400
     
  • U.S. unit to arrive in Colombia to help fight drug trafficking      Wed, 27 May 2020 22:04:12 -0400

    U.S. unit to arrive in Colombia to help fight drug traffickingA U.S. army unit will arrive in Colombia in the coming days to help the Andean country's armed forces fight against drug trafficking for a four-month period, the U.S. embassy in Bogota said on Wednesday. The U.S. Security Force Assistance Brigade (SFAB) will arrive in Colombia in early June, the embassy said, without specifying the size of the unit. "SFAB's mission in Colombia is an opportunity to demonstrate our mutual commitment against drug trafficking and support for regional peace, respect for sovereignty and the lasting promise to defend shared ideals and values," said U.S. Southern Commander Admiral Craig Faller in a statement.


    U.S. unit to arrive in Colombia to help fight drug traffickingA U.S. army unit will arrive in Colombia in the coming days to help the Andean country's armed forces fight against drug trafficking for a four-month period, the U.S. embassy in Bogota said on Wednesday. The U.S. Security Force Assistance Brigade (SFAB) will arrive in Colombia in early June, the embassy said, without specifying the size of the unit. "SFAB's mission in Colombia is an opportunity to demonstrate our mutual commitment against drug trafficking and support for regional peace, respect for sovereignty and the lasting promise to defend shared ideals and values," said U.S. Southern Commander Admiral Craig Faller in a statement.


     

  • WH press secretary: Trump says he’s feeling ‘absolutely great’ after taking hydroxychloroquine      Thu, 28 May 2020 17:14:17 -0400

    WH press secretary: Trump says he’s feeling ‘absolutely great’ after taking hydroxychloroquineAt a press briefing on Thursday, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany told reporters President Trump said he’s feeling “absolutely great” after completing his treatment with the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a preventive measure against the coronavirus. In April, the FDA cautioned against using the drug to treat COVID-19 outside of a hospital setting or clinical trial.


    WH press secretary: Trump says he’s feeling ‘absolutely great’ after taking hydroxychloroquineAt a press briefing on Thursday, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany told reporters President Trump said he’s feeling “absolutely great” after completing his treatment with the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a preventive measure against the coronavirus. In April, the FDA cautioned against using the drug to treat COVID-19 outside of a hospital setting or clinical trial.


     

  • Why India must battle the shame of period stain      Thu, 28 May 2020 13:38:49 -0400

    Why India must battle the shame of period stainAward-winning photographer Niraj Gera takes on stigma surrounding menstruation in India.


    Why India must battle the shame of period stainAward-winning photographer Niraj Gera takes on stigma surrounding menstruation in India.


     

  • Another cruise crew member in coronavirus limbo dies of apparent suicide      Wed, 27 May 2020 17:33:26 -0400

    Another cruise crew member in coronavirus limbo dies of apparent suicideA cruise ship crew member died last week of self-inflicted harm, the US Coast Guard said Wednesday as it confirmed the latest in a series of apparent suicides among such workers trapped at sea because of the coronavirus pandemic. A 32-year-old Filipino worker on a ship called Scarlet Lady, the only cruise ship owned by Virgin Voyages, died of "apparent self-harm," the Coast Guard told AFP. The Florida-based company founded by British billionaire Richard Branson expressed its condolences over the death of its employee but gave no details of what happened.


    Another cruise crew member in coronavirus limbo dies of apparent suicideA cruise ship crew member died last week of self-inflicted harm, the US Coast Guard said Wednesday as it confirmed the latest in a series of apparent suicides among such workers trapped at sea because of the coronavirus pandemic. A 32-year-old Filipino worker on a ship called Scarlet Lady, the only cruise ship owned by Virgin Voyages, died of "apparent self-harm," the Coast Guard told AFP. The Florida-based company founded by British billionaire Richard Branson expressed its condolences over the death of its employee but gave no details of what happened.


     

  • Mitch McConnell stresses need to wear face masks in public      Thu, 28 May 2020 14:23:50 -0400

    Mitch McConnell stresses need to wear face masks in publicWading into a politically charged issue, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Thursday preached the importance of wearing masks in public as the nation's economy reopens from the “cataclysmic" damage inflicted by the coronavirus pandemic. During a tour of hospitals this week in his home state of Kentucky, the Republican leader has stressed wearing masks in public and following social distancing guidelines. “There should be no stigma attached to wearing a mask," McConnell said during an appearance in Owensboro.


    Mitch McConnell stresses need to wear face masks in publicWading into a politically charged issue, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Thursday preached the importance of wearing masks in public as the nation's economy reopens from the “cataclysmic" damage inflicted by the coronavirus pandemic. During a tour of hospitals this week in his home state of Kentucky, the Republican leader has stressed wearing masks in public and following social distancing guidelines. “There should be no stigma attached to wearing a mask," McConnell said during an appearance in Owensboro.


     

  • It looks like Trump's draft executive order targeting Facebook and Twitter got leaked online      Thu, 28 May 2020 07:48:22 -0400

    It looks like Trump's draft executive order targeting Facebook and Twitter got leaked onlinePresident Donald Trump is expected to sign such an order on Thursday.


    It looks like Trump's draft executive order targeting Facebook and Twitter got leaked onlinePresident Donald Trump is expected to sign such an order on Thursday.


     

  • George Floyd protests: Man calls police on black entrepreneurs for using same gym in Minneapolis in viral video      Thu, 28 May 2020 07:39:50 -0400

    George Floyd protests: Man calls police on black entrepreneurs for using same gym in Minneapolis in viral videoA white man in Minneapolis asked whether black men were entitled to use the same gym and threatened to call the police on them, amid protests at George Floyd’s death.The exchange between black gym users and a white man was posted online in an Instagram video on Tuesday before spreading on social media.


    George Floyd protests: Man calls police on black entrepreneurs for using same gym in Minneapolis in viral videoA white man in Minneapolis asked whether black men were entitled to use the same gym and threatened to call the police on them, amid protests at George Floyd’s death.The exchange between black gym users and a white man was posted online in an Instagram video on Tuesday before spreading on social media.


     

  • Gang of 26 arrested for allegedly smuggling people from Vietnam to Europe in investigation prompted by Essex lorry deaths      Wed, 27 May 2020 10:29:38 -0400

    Gang of 26 arrested for allegedly smuggling people from Vietnam to Europe in investigation prompted by Essex lorry deathsA gang of 26 suspected people smugglers have been arrested in France and Belgium in an investigation prompted by the deaths of 39 Vietnamese migrants found in the back of a lorry in Essex last year. The early morning raids took place in Paris and Brussels, with 13 people detained in each country. In Belgium, 11 Vietnamese and two Moroccans were held, while in France, authorities said the suspects were “mostly Vietnamese and French”. The suspects are allegedly part of an organised crime group that smuggles refugees from Asia, particularly from Vietnam, and that likely has transported up to several dozen people every day for several months, Europol said in a statement. “Prompted by the discovery of 39 deceased Vietnamese nationals inside a refrigerated trailer in Essex in the United Kingdom in October 2019, a joint investigation team (JIT) was created between Belgium, Ireland, France, the United Kingdom, Eurojust and Europol,” Europol said.


    Gang of 26 arrested for allegedly smuggling people from Vietnam to Europe in investigation prompted by Essex lorry deathsA gang of 26 suspected people smugglers have been arrested in France and Belgium in an investigation prompted by the deaths of 39 Vietnamese migrants found in the back of a lorry in Essex last year. The early morning raids took place in Paris and Brussels, with 13 people detained in each country. In Belgium, 11 Vietnamese and two Moroccans were held, while in France, authorities said the suspects were “mostly Vietnamese and French”. The suspects are allegedly part of an organised crime group that smuggles refugees from Asia, particularly from Vietnam, and that likely has transported up to several dozen people every day for several months, Europol said in a statement. “Prompted by the discovery of 39 deceased Vietnamese nationals inside a refrigerated trailer in Essex in the United Kingdom in October 2019, a joint investigation team (JIT) was created between Belgium, Ireland, France, the United Kingdom, Eurojust and Europol,” Europol said.


     

  • Senate Democrats take on GOP court-packing in blistering new report      Wed, 27 May 2020 18:12:00 -0400

    Senate Democrats take on GOP court-packing in blistering new reportThe senators pointed to conservative activist Leonard Leo as the driving force behind the many of the president's appointments.


    Senate Democrats take on GOP court-packing in blistering new reportThe senators pointed to conservative activist Leonard Leo as the driving force behind the many of the president's appointments.


     

  • Biden on 100,000 coronavirus deaths: 'To those hurting, the nation grieves with you.'      Wed, 27 May 2020 19:39:11 -0400

    Biden on 100,000 coronavirus deaths: 'To those hurting, the nation grieves with you.'Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden released a video message on Wednesday marking the grim milestone of 100,000 American lives lost to the coronavirus pandemic, telling the bereaved: "The nation grieves with you." Biden spoke after various tallies of COVID-19 deaths, including one compiled by Reuters, showed that the novel coronavirus has killed over 100,000 people in the United States, even as the slowdown in deaths encouraged businesses to reopen and Americans to emerge from more than two months of lockdowns. Biden, speaking from his home in Delaware, drew on his own family loss when making his remarks.


    Biden on 100,000 coronavirus deaths: 'To those hurting, the nation grieves with you.'Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden released a video message on Wednesday marking the grim milestone of 100,000 American lives lost to the coronavirus pandemic, telling the bereaved: "The nation grieves with you." Biden spoke after various tallies of COVID-19 deaths, including one compiled by Reuters, showed that the novel coronavirus has killed over 100,000 people in the United States, even as the slowdown in deaths encouraged businesses to reopen and Americans to emerge from more than two months of lockdowns. Biden, speaking from his home in Delaware, drew on his own family loss when making his remarks.


     

  • Cheered by Private Schools, DeVos Demands Public Education Shares Pandemic Aid      Wed, 27 May 2020 15:01:11 -0400

    Cheered by Private Schools, DeVos Demands Public Education Shares Pandemic AidWASHINGTON -- Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, defiant amid criticism that she is using the coronavirus pandemic to pursue a long-sought agenda, said she will force public school districts to share a large portion of federal rescue funding with private school students, regardless of income.DeVos announced the measure in a letter to the Council of Chief State School Officers, which represents state education chiefs, defending her position on how education funding from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, or CARES Act, should be spent."The CARES Act is a special, pandemic-related appropriation to benefit all American students, teachers and families," DeVos wrote in the letter Friday. "There is nothing in the act suggesting Congress intended to discriminate between children based on public or nonpublic school attendance, as you seem to do. The virus affects everyone."A range of education officials say DeVos' guidance would divert millions of dollars away from disadvantaged students and force districts starved of tax revenues during an economic crisis to support even the wealthiest private schools. The association representing the nation's schools superintendents told districts to ignore the guidance, and at least two states -- Indiana and Maine -- said they would.DeVos accused the state education chiefs of having a "reflex to share as little as possible with students and teachers outside of their control" and said she would draft a rule codifying her position to "resolve any issues in plenty of time for the next school year." The proposed rule would need to go through a public comment process before it could take effect.Private school leaders​​​, who serve about 5.7 million of the nation's children, say they too are in crisis. Enrollment and tuition revenues are plunging along with philanthropic donations and church collections that help some religious schools operate. Many of those schools serve low-income students whose parents have fled failing public schools. Private school groups say 30% of ​the​ families​ they serve have​ annual incomes below $75,000, and those families are most at risk without federal aid. ​"I don't understand why we have to pick winners and losers when everything we're asking for is targeted at helping children and families," said Jennifer Daniels, associate director for public policy for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.Under federal education law, school districts are required to use funding intended for their poorest students to provide "equitable services," such as tutoring and transportation, for low-income students attending private schools in their districts. But DeVos maintains the coronavirus rescue law does not limit funding to just poor students, and her guidance would award private schools more services than the law would normally require.Last week, leaders from education committees in the House and Senate, including Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., said DeVos' interpretation was flawed.Democratic leaders called on DeVos to revise her guidance, which they said would "repurpose hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars intended for public school students to provide services for private school students, in contravention of both the plain reading of the statute and the intent of Congress."Carissa Moffat Miller, executive director of the Council of Chief State School Officers, said the organization believed the secretary's guidance "could significantly harm the vulnerable students who were intended to benefit the most from the critical federal COVID-19 education relief funds Congress has provided."DeVos has been unabashed in her use of coronavirus funding to further her decadeslong effort to divert public dollars to private and parochial schools. In a radio interview last week, first reported by Chalkbeat, the Roman Catholic archbishop of New York, Cardinal Timothy Dolan, asked DeVos if she was "utilizing this particular crisis to ensure that justice is finally done to our kids and the parents who choose to send them to faith-based schools." She responded, "Absolutely."In her letter, DeVos said "a growing list of nonpublic schools have announced they will not be able to reopen, and these school closures are concentrated in low-income and middle-class communities."At least 26 schools, the vast majority of them Catholic, have announced closures caused by or attributed to the pandemic, according to the Cato Institute, a libertarian research organization that is tracking such announcements. The National Catholic Educational Association said that at least 100 of its member schools are at risk of not reopening. More than 40 groups that support private schools wrote to House and Senate leaders this month asking for tuition aid, tax credits for families and other measures to prevent "massive nonpublic school closures."Leaders in some religious communities say they cannot fall back on public education."It is unthinkable for us not to give our children a Jewish education, in the same way it is unthinkable for us not to keep the Sabbath or the kosher dietary laws -- it is fundamental to Jewish life," said Rabbi Abba Cohen, vice president for federal affairs at Agudath Israel of America, one of the groups that signed the letter.Earlier this month, the Archdiocese of Newark, New Jersey, announced it would close 10 schools. ​While the organization said a plan to consolidate had already been underway, Cardinal Joseph Tobin, archbishop of Newark, ​wrote in a letter to the community that​ "this historical moment presents crucial challenges to the sustainability and ongoing success of our schools."Among the closed schools was Cristo Rey Newark High School, part of a network of 37 Catholic college-preparatory schools across the country that exclusively serves low-income students."My concern is that people are painting this with a very large brush stroke that's based on an assumption that Catholic and private means fancy and expensive, and that is not the case," said Elizabeth Goettl, president of the Cristo Rey Network.Ninety-eight percent of the network's 12,000 students are students of color, and all of them are from financially disadvantaged families, Goettl said. Only 10% of the schools' operational revenue comes from tuition, and every family pays what they can on a sliding scale, on average about $900 a year, though some pay as little as $20 a month.Fifty percent of the school's operational revenue comes from a corporate work-study program that could be affected by the economic fallout from the pandemic. Companies employ students in entry-level jobs, and students assign their wages to their tuition."They're literally earning their education at age 14, which is remarkable in itself," she said. "For the federal government to say we're not going to help your kids sanitize, or do whatever COVID-related things that need to be done, seems reprehensible."A recently passed House bill would limit private schools from accessing any new emergency relief funding, including equitable services. But private school leaders have launched an aggressive campaign to lobby Congress and the White House."When all is said and done, people are going to try to do the right thing and not try to pick which students we're not going to keep safe," said Michael Schuttloffel, executive director of the Council for American Private Education.Private school groups lobbying Congress say that mass closures would also hurt public schools. If 20% of private school students have to be absorbed into the public school system, it would cost the public system roughly $15 billion, according to estimates from those groups.Public school groups said that the argument proves their point."I think it's more proof that we need to be focused on public education, because if public education is not fully funded, there is no fallback," said Maggie Garrett, co-chairwoman of the National Coalition for Public Education, which represents more than 50 national organizations that oppose private school vouchers.Ruth Arias, an Amazon warehouse worker and single mother of five in New York City, said moving her children back to their neighborhood school would mean taking them "out of a place where they feel their best and putting them into a school system where they fall apart."With the help of an organization called the Children's Scholarship Fund, Arias said she enrolled her children in a private Christian school to "believe in something better."Arias was battling the coronavirus last month when she saw that the city's Department of Education would help students get iPads for remote learning.Having only one computer and a cellphone for her children to share, she was relieved -- until she was told her children's private schooling made them ineligible."I honestly had one thought," she said, "which I had a lot when I was dealing with the public school system: Are you kidding me?"This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


    Cheered by Private Schools, DeVos Demands Public Education Shares Pandemic AidWASHINGTON -- Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, defiant amid criticism that she is using the coronavirus pandemic to pursue a long-sought agenda, said she will force public school districts to share a large portion of federal rescue funding with private school students, regardless of income.DeVos announced the measure in a letter to the Council of Chief State School Officers, which represents state education chiefs, defending her position on how education funding from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, or CARES Act, should be spent."The CARES Act is a special, pandemic-related appropriation to benefit all American students, teachers and families," DeVos wrote in the letter Friday. "There is nothing in the act suggesting Congress intended to discriminate between children based on public or nonpublic school attendance, as you seem to do. The virus affects everyone."A range of education officials say DeVos' guidance would divert millions of dollars away from disadvantaged students and force districts starved of tax revenues during an economic crisis to support even the wealthiest private schools. The association representing the nation's schools superintendents told districts to ignore the guidance, and at least two states -- Indiana and Maine -- said they would.DeVos accused the state education chiefs of having a "reflex to share as little as possible with students and teachers outside of their control" and said she would draft a rule codifying her position to "resolve any issues in plenty of time for the next school year." The proposed rule would need to go through a public comment process before it could take effect.Private school leaders​​​, who serve about 5.7 million of the nation's children, say they too are in crisis. Enrollment and tuition revenues are plunging along with philanthropic donations and church collections that help some religious schools operate. Many of those schools serve low-income students whose parents have fled failing public schools. Private school groups say 30% of ​the​ families​ they serve have​ annual incomes below $75,000, and those families are most at risk without federal aid. ​"I don't understand why we have to pick winners and losers when everything we're asking for is targeted at helping children and families," said Jennifer Daniels, associate director for public policy for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.Under federal education law, school districts are required to use funding intended for their poorest students to provide "equitable services," such as tutoring and transportation, for low-income students attending private schools in their districts. But DeVos maintains the coronavirus rescue law does not limit funding to just poor students, and her guidance would award private schools more services than the law would normally require.Last week, leaders from education committees in the House and Senate, including Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., said DeVos' interpretation was flawed.Democratic leaders called on DeVos to revise her guidance, which they said would "repurpose hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars intended for public school students to provide services for private school students, in contravention of both the plain reading of the statute and the intent of Congress."Carissa Moffat Miller, executive director of the Council of Chief State School Officers, said the organization believed the secretary's guidance "could significantly harm the vulnerable students who were intended to benefit the most from the critical federal COVID-19 education relief funds Congress has provided."DeVos has been unabashed in her use of coronavirus funding to further her decadeslong effort to divert public dollars to private and parochial schools. In a radio interview last week, first reported by Chalkbeat, the Roman Catholic archbishop of New York, Cardinal Timothy Dolan, asked DeVos if she was "utilizing this particular crisis to ensure that justice is finally done to our kids and the parents who choose to send them to faith-based schools." She responded, "Absolutely."In her letter, DeVos said "a growing list of nonpublic schools have announced they will not be able to reopen, and these school closures are concentrated in low-income and middle-class communities."At least 26 schools, the vast majority of them Catholic, have announced closures caused by or attributed to the pandemic, according to the Cato Institute, a libertarian research organization that is tracking such announcements. The National Catholic Educational Association said that at least 100 of its member schools are at risk of not reopening. More than 40 groups that support private schools wrote to House and Senate leaders this month asking for tuition aid, tax credits for families and other measures to prevent "massive nonpublic school closures."Leaders in some religious communities say they cannot fall back on public education."It is unthinkable for us not to give our children a Jewish education, in the same way it is unthinkable for us not to keep the Sabbath or the kosher dietary laws -- it is fundamental to Jewish life," said Rabbi Abba Cohen, vice president for federal affairs at Agudath Israel of America, one of the groups that signed the letter.Earlier this month, the Archdiocese of Newark, New Jersey, announced it would close 10 schools. ​While the organization said a plan to consolidate had already been underway, Cardinal Joseph Tobin, archbishop of Newark, ​wrote in a letter to the community that​ "this historical moment presents crucial challenges to the sustainability and ongoing success of our schools."Among the closed schools was Cristo Rey Newark High School, part of a network of 37 Catholic college-preparatory schools across the country that exclusively serves low-income students."My concern is that people are painting this with a very large brush stroke that's based on an assumption that Catholic and private means fancy and expensive, and that is not the case," said Elizabeth Goettl, president of the Cristo Rey Network.Ninety-eight percent of the network's 12,000 students are students of color, and all of them are from financially disadvantaged families, Goettl said. Only 10% of the schools' operational revenue comes from tuition, and every family pays what they can on a sliding scale, on average about $900 a year, though some pay as little as $20 a month.Fifty percent of the school's operational revenue comes from a corporate work-study program that could be affected by the economic fallout from the pandemic. Companies employ students in entry-level jobs, and students assign their wages to their tuition."They're literally earning their education at age 14, which is remarkable in itself," she said. "For the federal government to say we're not going to help your kids sanitize, or do whatever COVID-related things that need to be done, seems reprehensible."A recently passed House bill would limit private schools from accessing any new emergency relief funding, including equitable services. But private school leaders have launched an aggressive campaign to lobby Congress and the White House."When all is said and done, people are going to try to do the right thing and not try to pick which students we're not going to keep safe," said Michael Schuttloffel, executive director of the Council for American Private Education.Private school groups lobbying Congress say that mass closures would also hurt public schools. If 20% of private school students have to be absorbed into the public school system, it would cost the public system roughly $15 billion, according to estimates from those groups.Public school groups said that the argument proves their point."I think it's more proof that we need to be focused on public education, because if public education is not fully funded, there is no fallback," said Maggie Garrett, co-chairwoman of the National Coalition for Public Education, which represents more than 50 national organizations that oppose private school vouchers.Ruth Arias, an Amazon warehouse worker and single mother of five in New York City, said moving her children back to their neighborhood school would mean taking them "out of a place where they feel their best and putting them into a school system where they fall apart."With the help of an organization called the Children's Scholarship Fund, Arias said she enrolled her children in a private Christian school to "believe in something better."Arias was battling the coronavirus last month when she saw that the city's Department of Education would help students get iPads for remote learning.Having only one computer and a cellphone for her children to share, she was relieved -- until she was told her children's private schooling made them ineligible."I honestly had one thought," she said, "which I had a lot when I was dealing with the public school system: Are you kidding me?"This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


     

  • Researchers tested 4,160 people for coronavirus in a San Francisco neighborhood. Not a single white person tested positive.      Thu, 28 May 2020 11:43:00 -0400

    Researchers tested 4,160 people for coronavirus in a San Francisco neighborhood. Not a single white person tested positive.A coronavirus testing project in San Francisco has provided yet another example of how COVID-19 is overwhelmingly affecting people of color.Diane Havlir, the director of the HIV/AIDS division at the University of California, San Francisco, noticed early in the pandemic that young Latino men were arriving at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital with coronavirus symptoms more often than any other demographic. So she conducted a research project that involved testing 4,160 residents of San Francisco's Mission District — and found that not a single white person tested positive, Stat News reports.Havlir's project focused on a single, 16-square-block census tract in the Mission district, "one of the city's most densely populated and heavily Latinx neighborhoods," Stat News writes. A third of the tract's residents are white, while 58 percent are Hispanic, the U.S. Census estimates. But 95 percent of those who tested positive were Latinx, while no white person in the tract tested positive.Just like testing and death rates are revealing across the country, "what really comes out of these data is that low-wage essential workers are victims of this disease," Havlir told Stat News. And with 53 percent of those who tested positive showing no symptoms of coronavirus, it's even more clear that allowing workers to stay home only if they feel sick may not be enough to stop the spread. Read more at Stat News.More stories from theweek.com Amy Klobuchar declined to prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints Minneapolis official calls for naming 'disease' of racism a public health issue after George Floyd death Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat'


    Researchers tested 4,160 people for coronavirus in a San Francisco neighborhood. Not a single white person tested positive.A coronavirus testing project in San Francisco has provided yet another example of how COVID-19 is overwhelmingly affecting people of color.Diane Havlir, the director of the HIV/AIDS division at the University of California, San Francisco, noticed early in the pandemic that young Latino men were arriving at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital with coronavirus symptoms more often than any other demographic. So she conducted a research project that involved testing 4,160 residents of San Francisco's Mission District — and found that not a single white person tested positive, Stat News reports.Havlir's project focused on a single, 16-square-block census tract in the Mission district, "one of the city's most densely populated and heavily Latinx neighborhoods," Stat News writes. A third of the tract's residents are white, while 58 percent are Hispanic, the U.S. Census estimates. But 95 percent of those who tested positive were Latinx, while no white person in the tract tested positive.Just like testing and death rates are revealing across the country, "what really comes out of these data is that low-wage essential workers are victims of this disease," Havlir told Stat News. And with 53 percent of those who tested positive showing no symptoms of coronavirus, it's even more clear that allowing workers to stay home only if they feel sick may not be enough to stop the spread. Read more at Stat News.More stories from theweek.com Amy Klobuchar declined to prosecute officer at center of George Floyd's death after previous conduct complaints Minneapolis official calls for naming 'disease' of racism a public health issue after George Floyd death Trump retweets video declaring 'the only good Democrat is a dead Democrat'


     

  • Child grooming: Police record 10,000 social media offences      Thu, 28 May 2020 19:08:47 -0400

    Child grooming: Police record 10,000 social media offencesIn just two-and-a-half years, police in England and Wales recorded 10,119 online grooming offences.


    Child grooming: Police record 10,000 social media offencesIn just two-and-a-half years, police in England and Wales recorded 10,119 online grooming offences.


     

  • Russia slams 'dangerous' US foreign policy moves      Thu, 28 May 2020 18:00:37 -0400

    Russia slams 'dangerous' US foreign policy movesRussia said on Thursday the United States was acting in a dngerous and unpredictable way, after Washington withdrew from a key military treaty and moved to ramp up pressure on Iran. Foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova made the comments after Washington announced it would end sanctions waivers for nations that remain in a nuclear accord signed with Iran.


    Russia slams 'dangerous' US foreign policy movesRussia said on Thursday the United States was acting in a dngerous and unpredictable way, after Washington withdrew from a key military treaty and moved to ramp up pressure on Iran. Foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova made the comments after Washington announced it would end sanctions waivers for nations that remain in a nuclear accord signed with Iran.


     

  • Twitter fact-checked a Chinese government spokesman after he suggested the US brought COVID-19 to Wuhan      Thu, 28 May 2020 07:23:04 -0400

    Twitter fact-checked a Chinese government spokesman after he suggested the US brought COVID-19 to WuhanTwitter applied the label to the tweets after being questioned by the New York Post over a potential double standard, The Post reports.


    Twitter fact-checked a Chinese government spokesman after he suggested the US brought COVID-19 to WuhanTwitter applied the label to the tweets after being questioned by the New York Post over a potential double standard, The Post reports.


     

  • US: Transgender sports inclusion violates others' rights      Thu, 28 May 2020 10:18:48 -0400

    US: Transgender sports inclusion violates others' rightsConnecticut's policy allowing transgender girls to compete as girls in high school sports violates the civil rights of athletes who have always identified as female, the U.S. Education Department has determined in a decision that could force the state to change course to keep federal funding and influence others to do the same. A letter from the department's civil rights office, a copy of which was obtained Thursday by The Associated Press, came in response to a complaint filed last year by several cisgender female track athletes who argued that two transgender female runners had an unfair physical advantage. The office said in the 45-page letter that it may seek to withhold federal funding over the policy, which allows athletes to participate under the gender with which they identify.


    US: Transgender sports inclusion violates others' rightsConnecticut's policy allowing transgender girls to compete as girls in high school sports violates the civil rights of athletes who have always identified as female, the U.S. Education Department has determined in a decision that could force the state to change course to keep federal funding and influence others to do the same. A letter from the department's civil rights office, a copy of which was obtained Thursday by The Associated Press, came in response to a complaint filed last year by several cisgender female track athletes who argued that two transgender female runners had an unfair physical advantage. The office said in the 45-page letter that it may seek to withhold federal funding over the policy, which allows athletes to participate under the gender with which they identify.


     

  • Minneapolis Man: Cop Who Kneeled on George Floyd ‘Tried to Kill Me’ in 2008      Thu, 28 May 2020 12:27:01 -0400

    Minneapolis Man: Cop Who Kneeled on George Floyd ‘Tried to Kill Me’ in 2008Ira Latrell Toles didn’t immediately recognize Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin in the now-viral video of him holding his knee on George Floyd’s neck as the handcuffed black man repeatedly told him he couldn’t breathe.But when news outlets identified the officers involved, Toles, 33, realized the man responsible for Floyd’s death was the same police officer who barged into his home and beat him up in the bathroom before shooting him in the stomach 12 years earlier while responding to a domestic violence call. “The officer that killed that guy might be the one that shot me,” Toles texted his sister on Tuesday night, according to messages shared with The Daily Beast. “They said his last name and I think it was him.”“It’s him,” his sister instantly replied.On Tuesday, Chauvin was one of four officers fired for his involvement in Floyd’s death, which has sparked protests across the country and calls for a federal hate-crime investigation. Local outlets reported that Chauvin was the officer who knelt on Floyd’s neck for several minutes—as the 46-year-old pleaded, “I’m about to die.” Floyd had no pulse when he was finally put into an ambulance.‘Burn It Down. Let Them Pay’: Deadly Chaos Erupts in Minneapolis as Fires Rage Over Police ViolenceMinneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey on Wednesday called for Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman to arrest and charge Chauvin with Floyd’s death. “Why is the man who killed George Floyd not in jail? If you had done it, or I had done it, we would be behind bars right now,” Frey said in a news conference.Toles believes that Floyd’s horrific death could have been prevented if Chauvin was properly punished for his violent arrest in May 2008. He said that while he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge—and still suffers pain from the bullet hole in his lower stomach—Chauvin continued his career at the Minneapolis Police Department with nothing more than a slap on the wrist.“If he was reprimanded when he shot me, George Floyd would still be alive,” the IT professional said. Authorities said that just before 2 a.m on May 24, 2008, officers responded to a domestic violence call at an apartment complex on Columbus Ave South. The 911 operator could hear a woman yelling for somebody to stop hitting her, local media reported at the time. Toles, who was then 21, admits that the mother of his child called the cops on him that night, but he was surprised when several officers showed up without announcing themselves. “When I saw that he breached the front door, I ran in the bathroom,” Toles told The Daily Beast. “Then [Chauvin] starts kicking in that door. I was in the bathroom with a cigarette and no lighter.”The 33-year-old said that Chauvin broke into the bathroom and started to hit him without warning. Toles said he returned blows to the officer because “my natural reaction to someone hitting me is to stop them from hitting me.” “All I could do is assume it was the police because they didn’t announce themselves or ever give me a command,” he said. “I didn’t know what to think when he started hitting me. I swear he was hitting me with the gun.”According to local news reports, Chauvin shot and wounded Toles after he allegedly reached for an officer’s gun. Toles said he doesn’t remember being shot—just “being walked through the apartment until I collapsed in the main entrance where I was left to bleed until the paramedics came.” “I remember my baby mother screaming and crying also,” he added.Toles was taken to Hennepin County Medical Center, where he said he stayed for about three days. There, he learned Chauvin had shot him at such close range that the bullet went through his groin and came out his left butt cheek before hitting the bathroom wall. The wound, he said, left a hole that “never really closed” and is so large he can still stick a finger inside. Once he was released from the hospital, Toles said he was taken directly to court, where he was charged with two felony counts of obstructing legal process or arrest and a misdemeanor count of domestic assault. “I would assume my reaction would be to try to stop him from hitting me. If his first reaction was hitting me in the face that means I can’t see and I’m too disoriented to first locate his gun and then try to take it from him and for what?” Toles said. “To turn a misdemeanor disorderly situation into a felony situation that could have resulted in me dying? He tried to kill me in that bathroom.” Toles said he only spent a day or two in jail—where he was denied pain pills—for the charges before he was released. Three months later, he said he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge as part of a deal.Chauvin and the other officers involved were put on paid administrative leave pending an investigation into the shooting—a standard procedure for the Minneapolis Police Department—but were later placed back into the field. “I knew he would do something again,” Toles said. “I wish we had smartphones back then.”The Minneapolis Police Department did not immediately respond to The Daily Beast’s request for comment. Chauvin, 44, is one of four officers who responded to a suspected “forgery in process” on Monday night—along with Thomas Lane, J Alexander Kueng, and Tou Thao.In the gut-wrenching, 10-minute video recorded by a bystander, Chauvin is seen pressing his knee on Floyd’s neck while Thao stands guard, trying to keep upset bystanders at bay. “Please, please, please, I can’t breathe. Please, man,” Floyd says in the footage that does not show the beginning of the arrest. “I’m about to die,” he says. A Minneapolis Fire Department report said Floyd did not have a pulse when he was loaded into an ambulance. He was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital shortly after in what police described as a “medical incident.”“We are looking and demanding that these officers be arrested and charged with the murder of George Floyd,” Ben Crump, a civil rights attorney representing the 46-year-old’s family, told The Daily Beast on Thursday. “My hope is that there will be effective and courageous leadership that will speak to the value of George Floyd’s life as an example to the world that black lives matter. It’s time for a change in Minneapolis.”Chauvin, who joined the force in 2001, has also been involved in several other police-involved shootings throughout his career. According to Communities United Against Police Brutality, 10 complaints have been filed against the now-former police officer—but Chauvin only ever received two verbal reprimands.In 2006, Chauvin was involved in the fatal shooting of 42-year-old Wayne Reyes, who allegedly stabbed two people before reportedly turning a gun on police. Chauvin was among six officers to respond to the stabbing. A year prior, Chauvin and another officer were also chasing a car that then hit and killed three people, according to Communities United Against Police Brutality.In 2011, the officer was also one of five officers placed on a standard three-day leave after the non-fatal shooting of a Native American man. The officers returned to work after the department determined that they had acted “appropriately.”The city’s Civilian Review Authority, which lists complaints prior to September 2012, shows five more complaints against Chauvin, which were closed without discipline. A prisoner at a Minnesota correctional facility sued Chauvin and seven other officers for “alleged violations of his federal constitutional rights” in 2006, although the case was dismissed and the details were not clear.Toles said that while he has not protested himself, he believes this horrific incident is a watershed moment for the Minneapolis Police Department—an agency that he says has become the butt of a joke in the black community.“We joke about it in the black community but we know that a white person calling the cops on us is gonna go in their favor,” he said. The 33-year-old added that while he believes Floyd's death will finally bring change and reform that is necessary for Minneapolis, it’s outraged residents who will ensure that justice is finally seen. He added that while he never filed a complaint in 2008, he is now looking to sue the Minneapolis Police Department for the violent incident. “We’ve all reached our tipping point. Water boils at 212 degrees,” he said. “We’re at 600.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


    Minneapolis Man: Cop Who Kneeled on George Floyd ‘Tried to Kill Me’ in 2008Ira Latrell Toles didn’t immediately recognize Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin in the now-viral video of him holding his knee on George Floyd’s neck as the handcuffed black man repeatedly told him he couldn’t breathe.But when news outlets identified the officers involved, Toles, 33, realized the man responsible for Floyd’s death was the same police officer who barged into his home and beat him up in the bathroom before shooting him in the stomach 12 years earlier while responding to a domestic violence call. “The officer that killed that guy might be the one that shot me,” Toles texted his sister on Tuesday night, according to messages shared with The Daily Beast. “They said his last name and I think it was him.”“It’s him,” his sister instantly replied.On Tuesday, Chauvin was one of four officers fired for his involvement in Floyd’s death, which has sparked protests across the country and calls for a federal hate-crime investigation. Local outlets reported that Chauvin was the officer who knelt on Floyd’s neck for several minutes—as the 46-year-old pleaded, “I’m about to die.” Floyd had no pulse when he was finally put into an ambulance.‘Burn It Down. Let Them Pay’: Deadly Chaos Erupts in Minneapolis as Fires Rage Over Police ViolenceMinneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey on Wednesday called for Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman to arrest and charge Chauvin with Floyd’s death. “Why is the man who killed George Floyd not in jail? If you had done it, or I had done it, we would be behind bars right now,” Frey said in a news conference.Toles believes that Floyd’s horrific death could have been prevented if Chauvin was properly punished for his violent arrest in May 2008. He said that while he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge—and still suffers pain from the bullet hole in his lower stomach—Chauvin continued his career at the Minneapolis Police Department with nothing more than a slap on the wrist.“If he was reprimanded when he shot me, George Floyd would still be alive,” the IT professional said. Authorities said that just before 2 a.m on May 24, 2008, officers responded to a domestic violence call at an apartment complex on Columbus Ave South. The 911 operator could hear a woman yelling for somebody to stop hitting her, local media reported at the time. Toles, who was then 21, admits that the mother of his child called the cops on him that night, but he was surprised when several officers showed up without announcing themselves. “When I saw that he breached the front door, I ran in the bathroom,” Toles told The Daily Beast. “Then [Chauvin] starts kicking in that door. I was in the bathroom with a cigarette and no lighter.”The 33-year-old said that Chauvin broke into the bathroom and started to hit him without warning. Toles said he returned blows to the officer because “my natural reaction to someone hitting me is to stop them from hitting me.” “All I could do is assume it was the police because they didn’t announce themselves or ever give me a command,” he said. “I didn’t know what to think when he started hitting me. I swear he was hitting me with the gun.”According to local news reports, Chauvin shot and wounded Toles after he allegedly reached for an officer’s gun. Toles said he doesn’t remember being shot—just “being walked through the apartment until I collapsed in the main entrance where I was left to bleed until the paramedics came.” “I remember my baby mother screaming and crying also,” he added.Toles was taken to Hennepin County Medical Center, where he said he stayed for about three days. There, he learned Chauvin had shot him at such close range that the bullet went through his groin and came out his left butt cheek before hitting the bathroom wall. The wound, he said, left a hole that “never really closed” and is so large he can still stick a finger inside. Once he was released from the hospital, Toles said he was taken directly to court, where he was charged with two felony counts of obstructing legal process or arrest and a misdemeanor count of domestic assault. “I would assume my reaction would be to try to stop him from hitting me. If his first reaction was hitting me in the face that means I can’t see and I’m too disoriented to first locate his gun and then try to take it from him and for what?” Toles said. “To turn a misdemeanor disorderly situation into a felony situation that could have resulted in me dying? He tried to kill me in that bathroom.” Toles said he only spent a day or two in jail—where he was denied pain pills—for the charges before he was released. Three months later, he said he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge as part of a deal.Chauvin and the other officers involved were put on paid administrative leave pending an investigation into the shooting—a standard procedure for the Minneapolis Police Department—but were later placed back into the field. “I knew he would do something again,” Toles said. “I wish we had smartphones back then.”The Minneapolis Police Department did not immediately respond to The Daily Beast’s request for comment. Chauvin, 44, is one of four officers who responded to a suspected “forgery in process” on Monday night—along with Thomas Lane, J Alexander Kueng, and Tou Thao.In the gut-wrenching, 10-minute video recorded by a bystander, Chauvin is seen pressing his knee on Floyd’s neck while Thao stands guard, trying to keep upset bystanders at bay. “Please, please, please, I can’t breathe. Please, man,” Floyd says in the footage that does not show the beginning of the arrest. “I’m about to die,” he says. A Minneapolis Fire Department report said Floyd did not have a pulse when he was loaded into an ambulance. He was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital shortly after in what police described as a “medical incident.”“We are looking and demanding that these officers be arrested and charged with the murder of George Floyd,” Ben Crump, a civil rights attorney representing the 46-year-old’s family, told The Daily Beast on Thursday. “My hope is that there will be effective and courageous leadership that will speak to the value of George Floyd’s life as an example to the world that black lives matter. It’s time for a change in Minneapolis.”Chauvin, who joined the force in 2001, has also been involved in several other police-involved shootings throughout his career. According to Communities United Against Police Brutality, 10 complaints have been filed against the now-former police officer—but Chauvin only ever received two verbal reprimands.In 2006, Chauvin was involved in the fatal shooting of 42-year-old Wayne Reyes, who allegedly stabbed two people before reportedly turning a gun on police. Chauvin was among six officers to respond to the stabbing. A year prior, Chauvin and another officer were also chasing a car that then hit and killed three people, according to Communities United Against Police Brutality.In 2011, the officer was also one of five officers placed on a standard three-day leave after the non-fatal shooting of a Native American man. The officers returned to work after the department determined that they had acted “appropriately.”The city’s Civilian Review Authority, which lists complaints prior to September 2012, shows five more complaints against Chauvin, which were closed without discipline. A prisoner at a Minnesota correctional facility sued Chauvin and seven other officers for “alleged violations of his federal constitutional rights” in 2006, although the case was dismissed and the details were not clear.Toles said that while he has not protested himself, he believes this horrific incident is a watershed moment for the Minneapolis Police Department—an agency that he says has become the butt of a joke in the black community.“We joke about it in the black community but we know that a white person calling the cops on us is gonna go in their favor,” he said. The 33-year-old added that while he believes Floyd's death will finally bring change and reform that is necessary for Minneapolis, it’s outraged residents who will ensure that justice is finally seen. He added that while he never filed a complaint in 2008, he is now looking to sue the Minneapolis Police Department for the violent incident. “We’ve all reached our tipping point. Water boils at 212 degrees,” he said. “We’re at 600.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


     

  • China passes draft Hong Kong security law, sparking fear and anger      Thu, 28 May 2020 10:01:00 -0400

    China passes draft Hong Kong security law, sparking fear and anger"Hong Kong, in many ways, has become the new Berlin: the new meeting point of a big argument of big disagreement between two major powers."


    China passes draft Hong Kong security law, sparking fear and anger"Hong Kong, in many ways, has become the new Berlin: the new meeting point of a big argument of big disagreement between two major powers."


     

  • Putin says worst-case coronavirus scenario in Moscow averted as lockdown unwinds      Wed, 27 May 2020 03:44:01 -0400

    Putin says worst-case coronavirus scenario in Moscow averted as lockdown unwindsPresident Vladimir Putin said on Wednesday that Moscow, the epicentre of Russia's coronavirus outbreak, had succeeded in preventing what he called worst-case scenarios as the city announced it would ease tough lockdown measures within days. Speaking to Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin, an ally, by video conference, Putin said it was obvious the situation in the city of 12.7 million people had stabilised thanks to steps taken by the authorities. It was now time for Moscow to provide medical help to regions where the coronavirus remained rampant, said Putin, something Sobyanin said would be organised immediately.


    Putin says worst-case coronavirus scenario in Moscow averted as lockdown unwindsPresident Vladimir Putin said on Wednesday that Moscow, the epicentre of Russia's coronavirus outbreak, had succeeded in preventing what he called worst-case scenarios as the city announced it would ease tough lockdown measures within days. Speaking to Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin, an ally, by video conference, Putin said it was obvious the situation in the city of 12.7 million people had stabilised thanks to steps taken by the authorities. It was now time for Moscow to provide medical help to regions where the coronavirus remained rampant, said Putin, something Sobyanin said would be organised immediately.


     

  • Protester who hung effigy of Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear fired from job at car dealership      Wed, 27 May 2020 15:39:25 -0400

    Protester who hung effigy of Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear fired from job at car dealershipTerry Bush, president of the Kentucky 3 Percenters group, only hoisted the effigy, his wife Patsy said Wednesday morning.


    Protester who hung effigy of Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear fired from job at car dealershipTerry Bush, president of the Kentucky 3 Percenters group, only hoisted the effigy, his wife Patsy said Wednesday morning.


     

  • Coronavirus map of the US: latest cases state by state      Thu, 28 May 2020 09:06:10 -0400

    Coronavirus map of the US: latest cases state by state* Coronavirus: world map of deaths and cases * Coronavirus: latest US updates * Coronavirus: latest global updatesWith countries all over the world affected by the coronavirus pandemic, the US has emerged as a global hotspot. The Trump administration has been criticized for being slower to act than other countries. The US currently leads the world in both confirmed coronavirus cases and deaths according to Johns Hopkins University.It’s important to point out that the actual death toll is believed to be far higher than the tally compiled from government figures.default default * Due to the unprecedented and ongoing nature of the coronavirus outbreak, this article is being regularly updated to ensure that it reflects the current situation as best as possible. Any significant corrections made to this or previous versions of the article will continue to be footnoted in line with Guardian editorial policy.


    Coronavirus map of the US: latest cases state by state* Coronavirus: world map of deaths and cases * Coronavirus: latest US updates * Coronavirus: latest global updatesWith countries all over the world affected by the coronavirus pandemic, the US has emerged as a global hotspot. The Trump administration has been criticized for being slower to act than other countries. The US currently leads the world in both confirmed coronavirus cases and deaths according to Johns Hopkins University.It’s important to point out that the actual death toll is believed to be far higher than the tally compiled from government figures.default default * Due to the unprecedented and ongoing nature of the coronavirus outbreak, this article is being regularly updated to ensure that it reflects the current situation as best as possible. Any significant corrections made to this or previous versions of the article will continue to be footnoted in line with Guardian editorial policy.


     

  • 'Deeply disturbing' report into Ontario care homes released      Wed, 27 May 2020 13:28:23 -0400

    'Deeply disturbing' report into Ontario care homes releasedA Canadian armed forces report documented cases of insect infestation, force feeding, and neglect.


    'Deeply disturbing' report into Ontario care homes releasedA Canadian armed forces report documented cases of insect infestation, force feeding, and neglect.


     

  • Scientists warn of 'zombie fires' in the Arctic      Wed, 27 May 2020 13:23:27 -0400

    Scientists warn of 'zombie fires' in the ArcticDormant "zombie fires" scattered across the Arctic region -- remnants of record blazes last year -- may be coming to life after an unusually warm and dry Spring, scientists warned Wednesday. "We have seen satellite observations of active fires that hint that 'zombie' fires might have reignited," said Mark Parrington, a senior scientist and wildfire expert at the European Union's Copernicus Atmospheric Monitoring Service. The year 2019 was marked by fires unprecedented in scale and duration across large swathes of Siberia and Alaska.


    Scientists warn of 'zombie fires' in the ArcticDormant "zombie fires" scattered across the Arctic region -- remnants of record blazes last year -- may be coming to life after an unusually warm and dry Spring, scientists warned Wednesday. "We have seen satellite observations of active fires that hint that 'zombie' fires might have reignited," said Mark Parrington, a senior scientist and wildfire expert at the European Union's Copernicus Atmospheric Monitoring Service. The year 2019 was marked by fires unprecedented in scale and duration across large swathes of Siberia and Alaska.


     

  • Mitt Romney calls out ‘vile’ Donald Trump murder accusations against ‘psycho’ Joe Scarborough      Wed, 27 May 2020 11:26:36 -0400

    Mitt Romney calls out ‘vile’ Donald Trump murder accusations against ‘psycho’ Joe Scarborough“Never Trumper” Mitt Romney stepped in to defend his friend and former Republican congressman Joe Scarborough on Wednesday after the president renewed his Twitter feud against the MSNBC host.The Utah senator called the accusations vile and baseless after Donald Trump escalated his campaign against “psycho Joe” over the death of a former staffer Lori Klausutis, who died in Mr Scarborough’s office when he was a Florida congressman, also empathising with Klausutis’ husband.


    Mitt Romney calls out ‘vile’ Donald Trump murder accusations against ‘psycho’ Joe Scarborough“Never Trumper” Mitt Romney stepped in to defend his friend and former Republican congressman Joe Scarborough on Wednesday after the president renewed his Twitter feud against the MSNBC host.The Utah senator called the accusations vile and baseless after Donald Trump escalated his campaign against “psycho Joe” over the death of a former staffer Lori Klausutis, who died in Mr Scarborough’s office when he was a Florida congressman, also empathising with Klausutis’ husband.


     

  • Sweden touts the success of its controversial lockdown-free coronavirus strategy, but the country still has one of the highest mortality rates in the world      Tue, 26 May 2020 22:56:58 -0400

    Sweden touts the success of its controversial lockdown-free coronavirus strategy, but the country still has one of the highest mortality rates in the worldSome experts have said Sweden's risky strategy will eventually yield positive results, while others have highlighted serious pitfalls.


    Sweden touts the success of its controversial lockdown-free coronavirus strategy, but the country still has one of the highest mortality rates in the worldSome experts have said Sweden's risky strategy will eventually yield positive results, while others have highlighted serious pitfalls.


     

  • Mexican drug lord pleads poverty in bid to escape arrest      Wed, 27 May 2020 20:23:29 -0400

    Mexican drug lord pleads poverty in bid to escape arrestDrug lord Rafael Caro Quintero, a notorious underworld figure who is on the FBI’s most wanted list for the murder of a federal agent over three decades ago, said in a legal appeal that he has no money, is too old to work and has no pension. The odd plea was filed Tuesday by Caro Quintero's lawyer seeking an injunction against his arrest or extradition to the United States for the kidnapping and murder of DEA Special Agent Enrique Camarena in Mexico in 1985. The U.S. government says Caro Quintero and his family remain in the drug trade.


    Mexican drug lord pleads poverty in bid to escape arrestDrug lord Rafael Caro Quintero, a notorious underworld figure who is on the FBI’s most wanted list for the murder of a federal agent over three decades ago, said in a legal appeal that he has no money, is too old to work and has no pension. The odd plea was filed Tuesday by Caro Quintero's lawyer seeking an injunction against his arrest or extradition to the United States for the kidnapping and murder of DEA Special Agent Enrique Camarena in Mexico in 1985. The U.S. government says Caro Quintero and his family remain in the drug trade.


     

  • Pelosi calls on Trump to 'take responsibility' for coronavirus response      Wed, 27 May 2020 16:15:38 -0400

    Pelosi calls on Trump to 'take responsibility' for coronavirus responseIn a press conference Wednesday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi called on President Trump to “stop making excuses. Take responsibility” for his response to the coronavirus pandemic.


    Pelosi calls on Trump to 'take responsibility' for coronavirus responseIn a press conference Wednesday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi called on President Trump to “stop making excuses. Take responsibility” for his response to the coronavirus pandemic.


     



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